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Month: April 2018

SEO Basics: How to Use Keyword Research to Grow Your Business

SEO Basics: How to Use Keyword Research to Grow Your Business

As a copywriter and marketing expert, I’ve found SEO to be a really valuable tool. And that’s why I thought I’d put together this little step-by-step primer on SEO basics including using keyword research to grow your business .

But, first, let’s start with a little background on what SEO is and why it’s important.

SEO stands for “search engine optimization,” which is “the process of affecting the online visibility of a website or a web page in a web search engine’s unpaid results.”

The idea behind it is when your ideal clients are searching for your business on a search engine such as Google, Firefox, or Safari, you want your business to actually pop up in the search results.

The way that happens is to optimize your site for the search engines.

Now, there are some technical things you can do to help optimize your site (including paying attention to how fast your site loads and making sure it looks good on mobile devices), but really, the key is to make sure the search engines “know” your site is the best site for your ideal clients.

How do they know your site is precisely what your ideal clients are looking for?

Because you’re using the right keywords (which are the words and phrases your ideal clients are typing into the search engine to find you) on your site.

So, how do you know what those right keywords are?

That’s where this SEO basics primer comes in.

Ready? Let’s get started.

SEO Basics #1—Get clear on who your ideal clients are.

If you don’t know specifically who you’re trying to attract into your business, it’s going to be difficult to attract them. I have two articles here and here that can help.

SEO Basics 2—Get clear on the keywords your ideal clients are searching to find you.

For myself, this is a two-step process:

Step 1: Brainstorm all the words and phrases you think your ideal clients are using to find your products and services.

(It’s not necessary to spend a lot of time on this.)

Step 2: Use Google Keyword Planner for keyword research.

This is a free tool from Google, but you do have to sign up for an Adwords account (which is also free).

Once you do, look under the wrench icon:

Click on the wrench icon, then planner:

Now you can start your keyword research.

Here’s how it works:

Let’s say one of the keywords you brainstormed was “cooking.” You would enter “cooking” like so:

 

Once you hit enter, this is the screen you see:

See all the suggestions? This is a great resource to find the precise words and phrases your ideal clients would use to find your business.

So, what you want look at is high (or high-ish) monthly searches with LOW competition, because the higher the number, the higher the number of searches using those words..

Like the phrase, “what to cook for dinner.”

Other good ones are “cooking sites,” “cooking videos,” and “cooking tips.”

If there is high competition, that means there are a lot of sites using that phrase (not to mention a lot of businesses spending advertising money using that phrase). This makes it difficult to actually rank your site using that keyword or keyword phrase.

So, in this scenario, I would say “kids cooking” would not be a phrase to use as a keyword.

But, what if your business IS around helping kids cook? That’s when you would want to do more specific research around kids cooking, to see if there are other phrases that would work.

SEO Basics #3—Do your own searches using those keywords.

Open up your favorite search engine browser and do some searches using those keywords to see what comes up.

This will help you verify whether or not your ideal clients really are using those keywords. (If you end up on websites that don’t look like they would appeal to your ideal clients at all, that may be a sign you’re on the wrong track with your keywords.)

If your ideal clients are using those keywords, then you also want to get some idea what they’re seeing when they’re searching for you.

SEO Basics #4—Best practices for using your keyword research.

For myself, I use this SEO research in a variety of ways:

  1. To get a sense of which products, services, and programs my ideal clients (or my client’s ideal clients) are looking for and what language or words they’re using. The more we can create the products and programs and services our ideal clients want, and then market it to them using the words and phrases they’re using, the easier it will be to inspire them to buy.
  2. To create content (blog posts, videos, podcasts, etc.) to attract my ideal clients.
  3. To create marketing strategies that resonate with my ideal clients.

In a lot of ways, this type of research is really the backbone of any business.

And, if you’d like to dig more deeply into online marketing, including putting together an online marketing plan, my “Love-Based Online Marketing” book may be perfect for you.

Marketing problem? The Real Reasons Your Product/Service Might Not Be Selling

Marketing problem? The Real Reasons Your Product/Service Might Not Be Selling

It happens all the time. You have what you think is a “marketing problem.”

You have a disappointing product launch. You have issues consistently selling your services. A program that used to sell well stopped.

There are a lot of reasons why this could be happening, and in most (if not all) of the cases, the issue comes down to what looks like a marketing problem.

But, what if the marketing problem was a symptom, and not the cause?

What if the cause was something deeper … what if it had more to do with WHAT you’re selling?

And it’s really a form of sabotage?

And, the reason why it’s sabotage is because you have misgivings about the product or service or program you’re offering.

Before I dig into all the ways you can sabotage yourself, let’s explore all the ways you may be less than thrilled with your products, programs, or services.

• You don’t particularly like the product, service, or program you’re selling.

There’s a lot of ways this can manifest itself.

Maybe you became a coach only to realize you don’t like coaching, but now you have all these clients, and you’ve got money coming in—money your family is dependent on—so what can you do?

Or, maybe you love some types of coaching but not others. I see this a lot in the industry I’m in. There are many folks who want to be life coaches or spiritual coaches, but they struggle to make money, so they become a business coach instead.

Over time, many of these spiritual or life coaches come to detest business coaching.

I’ve highlighted some of these stories in my Love-Based Money podcastBarb, Anastasia, Sierra—all these women built up very successful coaching businesses only to tear it all down when they woke up one day and finally had to admit to themselves how much they hated what they built.

• You know this particular product, program, or service isn’t your best work.

Maybe you threw it together because you saw an opportunity and wanted to act fast, and the finished product ended up being on the sloppy side. Or maybe you discovered errors in it after the fact. Or maybe when you created it, it was a solid, well-put-together product, but now it’s out-of-date and really needs an upgrade. Or maybe the content is fine, but it has technical issues (bad video, bad audio, typos, etc.)

Regardless of how it happened, you know it’s not as good as you’d like it to be, and every time someone buys, you find yourself cringing inside.

• You don’t particularly like the clients, customers, or buyers you’re attracting.

If you’re selling a product where you have absolutely no contact with your buyers, this is less of an issue, but if the product or service includes any type of interaction, this is clearly an issue.

Think about it—if you dislike talking to your customers and clients, you’re probably going to dread getting on the phone with them or meeting them in person, or maybe even answering their emails.

How can you possibly get excited about marketing something that is going to require you to interact with people you don’t like?  Even if you are making good money, eventually there will come a time when the money no longer matters, and all you want is out.

• You’ve outgrown your product, program, or service.

Businesses are living entities. Over time, they grow, change, evolve, and even die.

As your business changes, so do your offerings.

Maybe a product or program or service that used to be a good fit isn’t anymore. Maybe it’s not in alignment with who you are or the message you want to get out into the world in a bigger way. Or maybe the graphics or branding around the product, program,or service needs an upgrade.

If you no longer feel what you’re offering is a good match for where you are now, it’s going to be difficult for you to promote it.

• You’re lacking the team, support, system, backend, etc. to create excellent customer service.

You may love coaching and your clients, but you have no system in place to onboard new clients. Your “welcome packet” (if you can call it that) is a mess, and it’s a crapshoot if you’re able to get your new clients scheduled in a timely manner.

Or maybe you have an online learning platform that doesn’t work very well, so you know every time you get a new student, you’re going to also get customer service emails full of questions and problems.

Or maybe you have no systems created around taking care of new clients and customers, or maybe you don’t have the right team members in place to take care of your clients and customers. Or, maybe you have a fabulous team, but they’re tapped out. They can’t handle any more clients or customers, so you’re not able to grow.

How can you market yourself when you no every new customer, client or buyer is going to add stress to your life?

• You’re secretly afraid your product, service, or program isn’t any good.

There are a lot of ways this can manifest itself: You don’t value yourself or what your offering, you’re afraid you’ll fail and let down your clients, you feel like you’re a fraud, you feel like you need to read “one more book” or get “one more certification” before you’re an expert.

If you feel like you’re selling snake oil, and the last thing you want is to be a snake oil salesperson, it’s going to be very difficult to consistently and effectively market or promote or sell your offerings.

So, those are some of the top ways you may be less than thrilled with your product, program, or service. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but hopefully it gives you some ideas on the questions to ask yourself around the product or program or service that just isn’t selling as well as you’d like.

Because if any of these are true (even if it’s just a little true), there’s likely a part of you that really doesn’t want any customers or clients to buy it. (Hence, why, on the surface, this would look like a “marketing problem” even though underneath what’s really happening is a form of sabotage.)

Think about it: If you don’t like what you’re selling, you’re not going to want to sell it.

If you don’t like your customers, you’re not going to want to spend time with them.

If you think your product or program or service is outdated or not very good, you may be embarrassed to have people buy it.

If you’re lacking the backend or customer support, you may know new clients and customers are just going to turn into massive headaches for you, and who needs that?

And, if you have any sort of feelings of fraud or not being good enough, how on earth could you in good faith take other people’s money for something you’re secretly afraid is crap?

Now, it’s entirely possible (and certainly does happen) that you can feel this and still push through to make a lot of money at whatever it is your selling. (My Love-Based Money podcast guests are a great example of forcing themselves to grow a business they weren’t in alignment with.)

But, for many entrepreneurs, even if they are able to make money in the short term with the product or service, they can’t sustain it. So, they end up in a financial rollercoaster.

You see, if you’re going to “force” yourself to market or sell something that you either don’t like or are ashamed of at some level, that means you’re going to need to use a lot of willpower to keep you going.

And, willpower will only take you so far.

So, then, what happens?

That’s when the sabotage kicks in.

Well, maybe you cut back on the number of emails you send in a launch, despite knowing (or being told) not to do that.

Maybe you deflate at the end of a sales call (and end up never making the sale).

Maybe you bomb any opportunity you get to be in front of your ideal clients (talks go wrong, weird tech issues show up on webinars, etc.).

Or maybe you and your marketing just slowly disappear. Maybe you stop hanging out on Facebook, even though you know it’s a great source of prospects for you. Maybe you stop posting regularly to your blog, or you don’t record your podcast consistently. Maybe you “take a break” from emailing your subscribers.

What do all of these have in common? On the surface they look like a marketing problem. (And, don’t get me wrong, they ARE a marketing problem.) But, what’s really going on is sabotage–you’re taking unconscious actions or making unconscious decisions to hurt your marketing.

You may not be aware of what you’re doing, or maybe you have some really good excuses for not doing the things you know you should. (And, truly, it’s not your fault if this is happening to you as this typically shows up as a big blindspot.)

But, regardless, the outcome is the same. Your sales aren’t great, and a part of you (which may be buried really deep inside) is glad.

And, this cycle of continuing to sabotage yourself while having it look like a marketing problem, will continue.

If any of this resonates with you, and you feel like you may need to go deeper, you may want to check out my “Love-Based Money and Mindset” book.

[Video] Flip It! How Do You Build a Business Around Multiple Passions?

[Video] Flip It! How Do You Build a Business Around Multiple Passions?

Before I dive into walking you though how to build a business around multiple passions, I thought I’d back up a step and talk about whether or not this is even a good idea.

Conventional wisdom says no. Never build a business around multiple passions.

And for years, I, too, would also advise entrepreneurs not to do it, because it’s a lot of work.

You see, while in some cases, it’s possible to build multiple passions under one business roof, in most cases, you’re building separate businesses.

And, if you’re building separate businesses, there’s just no getting around it.

It’s a lot of work.

It may not be twice the work, but it’s probably pretty close.

However, I’ve had a change of heart around whether it’s a good idea or not. Yes, it’s still a lot of work. (And, as someone who is actively building two different and distinct brands, I can tell you for a fact this is true.)

BUT, if this is calling you, if this is your path, then you absolutely need to walk down it.

Work or no work.

You see, for years I didn’t believe I was a multi-passionate entrepreneur.

Sure, I always knew I wanted to write fiction books. And, I was also over here on this side building a copywriting and marketing company. I also had nonfiction book ideas bubbling up.

But, for some reason, I never really saw that as having multiple business passions.

Instead, I saw them as separate. Fiction was over here, copywriting was over there, nonfiction books were in their own place, sort of close to the copywriting but kind of separate too.

And, because I saw them as separate, I also thought I could cut them off. I could simply not write fiction or nonfiction and it didn’t matter because these were all separate parts of me.

What I didn’t realize at the time was how unhealthy that was and how I was causing myself a lot of mental and emotional stress doing that.

I’m going to be sharing this journey to wholeness on my fiction blog, which is at MicheleParizaWacek.com if you want to read it from the creative side. But, what I want to do in this post is talk about HOW to build a business as a multi-passionate entrepreneur.

So, the first thing you need to do is accept there is quite a bit of work involved. That’s just the way it is. You’re going to have to commit to building two (or more) different businesses.

With that in mind, I want you to take a good, hard look at yourself and ask yourself this:

What do YOU need to do differently in order to have the energy, bandwidth, time and space to build multiple businesses?

Do you need to create systems?

Do you need to hire more team to support you?

Do you need to get ruthless around protecting your boundaries and your time?

Do you need to change your daily habits?

I also want you to take a good hard look at your current identity.

You see, I didn’t see myself as both a fiction author and an entrepreneur. Remember, I kept everything separate. So, I found it extremely exhausting bouncing between those two identities.

What I had to do is clear out the emotions and triggers so I could hold space for both identities AND they could both exist inside me without fighting with each other.

That meant giving myself space to feel all the emotions that came up for me. That also meant learning how to surrender and allow things to unfold in their own time rather than trying to push and force. Things are unfolding the way they are for a reason, and you have to trust the process and trust you’ll be taken care of throughout the process.

If you can do that, you’ll get to the place where you not only can hold both identities but where you’ll find it a joy to switch between them. And, yes, you’ll have more work on your plate, but you’re also getting a lot more done. (As a side note, in some ways, I’m putting in less hours working than I did as a freelance copywriter. I’m getting more done during work time, so I’m able to take focused time off as well).

If this is your path, it’s totally possible to do it. I’m not going to say it’s easy, but I will say it’s totally worth it.

(And if you’re wondering exactly how you can get everything you want simply by flipping your perspective? Check out the first episode here.)

If you liked this episode, you may also like my “Love-Based Goals” book and my “Love-Based Money and Mindset” book.

The Secret to Building a Business That Can Weather Any Storm … No Matter How Scary

The Secret to Building a Business That Can Weather Any Storm … No Matter How Scary

I was recently cleaning out some old papers I happened to find at the bottom of my desk, when I came across some teachings from Dan Kennedy.

If you haven’t heard of Dan Kennedy, he’s this old, grizzled marketing and copy guru and author of the No BS series of books. In the beginning of my career, I learned a lot about how to write traditional copy from him. (He was also the “Kennedy” in the Glazer-Kennedy Marketing company.)

I glanced through the papers and this Dan Kennedy quote caught my eye:

“If you’re still in the same business you were in 3-5 years ago, you have no business.”

I then looked at the date of the training and saw it was from 2012.

This really hit me, because, you see, my first thought when I read that quote was “how timely.” When really, Dan Kennedy wrote it six years ago.

For many entrepreneurs in the online information product industry (which includes the transformation industry), 2017 was a really rough year. That was the year we started to see how many of the business “truths” we thought were infallible were, in fact, very fallible.

And, for some entrepreneurs who had built businesses on those “infallible” truths, even big, multi-million-dollar businesses, were seeing massive cracks and their businesses crumble on what they thought was a pretty solid structure.

So, let’s start by acknowledging the truth: Yes, it can be scary. Very scary. If you’re worried or scared about the future of your business and you’re uncertain about what to do or which direction to go, you’re absolutely not alone. I  encourage you to feel whatever it is that wants to come up—just don’t let it stop you from taking action.

And let’s acknowledge another truth: It sucks.

Look, as humans, we are biologically wired to not like change. It’s in our DNA. Change can be dangerous to our very existence. So, as much as possible, our brains try to minimize change in order to keep us safe.

Which is why this idea of constantly looking at our businesses and seeing what we need to do differently is exhausting and overwhelming.

After all, don’t we want to just “set it and forget it”?

Wouldn’t it be nice to discover the “secret of success” and then finally stop looking?

Alas, if only it were that simple.

So, what’s the solution?

Well, I think first of all, acknowledge that it is both scary and daunting, AND decide to take action regardless.

Second, pay attention to your industry. Go to events, talk to friends and colleagues, follow people who follow trends and write about them (this blog can be a good place to start).

Third, know this:

Maybe it means that you tweak an existing product or service to better meet demand.

Maybe you change how you market.

Maybe you add a new product line or retire an old product line.

To be honest, you might even welcome some of changes.

Because, along with the landscape changing, you yourself are changing, and your business (which while not “alive” in the traditional sense, is still a living entity) are also changing.

Listen to what wants to emerge. Be open to what wants to change. (It’s easier to surrender to what wants to happen than it is to fight it.)

Lastly, know some things really DON’T ever change.

For instance, a business is really about finding and connecting with your ideal clients. It’s about building relationships. It’s about giving value. It’s about making offers your ideal clients want to buy. Those things don’t change.

And if you keep those business truths in mind (not to mention actually building your business on those truths and not the slippery, cracked “truths” of whatever is hot in the moment), you’ll be able to weather any storm …

No matter how scary it might initially look.

If you’d like to dig more deeply into building your business on a solid foundation, my Love-Based Business books can help, specifically my “Love-Based Online Marketing” book.

[Video] Flip It! Do You Break Commitments to Yourself?

[Video] Flip It! Do You Break Commitments to Yourself?

During the years when I was building my copywriting and marketing company, I almost never broke a commitment I made to another person, whether that person was a partner or client.

Now, that didn’t mean I wouldn’t renegotiate commitments, I absolutely did that. But, one of my core values is integrity, and over the years I spent a lot of time and energy to live my life and run my business from a place of integrity.

I may not have always succeeded and I most definitely made mistakes, but I always did the best I could in the moment.

EXCEPT when it came to commitments to myself.

Those, I broke. A lot.

My commitment to my own writing and books? Dead last on the list. Even commitments to marketing my business or creating other income streams were close to the bottom of my to-do list.

At the time, I called it “giving myself a break.” Typically, how it would play out is I would get a big client project or a lot of client work would walk in the door, and I would start to feel super overwhelmed and anxious about everything I had to do. So, I would “give myself a break” by moving or cancelling my own projects.

I always told myself once this “crazy” period was over, I would pick up where I left off. And of course, I rarely did, except for select marketing activities.

What I was really doing was giving myself permission to break commitments to myself.

Now, how this ended up playing out for me is I kept doing it until one day something deep inside me started to revolt. About the same time my mother got sick with cancer, so I had both external and internal pressures to change. That combination finally did it.

So, let’s talk about you. How are you showing up for your dreams and goals? Are you sitting down each day to honor them, even if that means writing a book you’re not sure anyone will ever read or writing blog posts for a blog no one is visiting or marketing a business that’s doesn’t seem to get any traction?

It’s tough. I know. I’ve been there. But, here’s the truth. The more you let yourself off the hook or give yourself a break and not show up for yourself and your dreams and goals, the more you’re going to throttle your success.

While it’s true I built a pretty successful business breaking commitments to myself, I was also often stressed, overwhelmed and consumed with worry. I burned out multiple times building that company.

Now that I’ve made commitments to myself as non-negotiable as the commitments I make to other people, everything has shifted. I’m a lot less stressed and a lot less overwhelmed, even though I’m actually getting more work done every day. I’m also a lot happier and a lot more at peace.

And the best part?  I’m starting to see a lot more traction and momentum in my business, more than I experienced before.

If you’re feeling stuck and trapped in a cycle where nothing you’re doing is working, I’d love to encourage you to take a moment and see where you’re showing up for yourself and where you’re breaking commitments to yourself. You may also want to check out an earlier Flip It episode titled “A Simple Marketing Exercise that Could Transform Your Business” and see what happens when you do that exercise.

One of the reasons why it’s so easy to break commitments to yourself is because it’s not public. Only you really knows what you did.

But, shouldn’t your relationship to yourself be the most important one in your life?

I can tell you from experience, the more you show up for yourself, the more you’ll get everything you want.

(And if you’re wondering exactly how you can get everything you want simply by flipping your perspective? Check out the first episode here.)

If you liked this episode, you may also like my “Love-Based Money and Mindset” book.

[Real World Analysis] How a Business with 12 Million Followers Went Bankrupt

[Real World Analysis] How a Business with 12 Million Followers Went Bankrupt

Before I get to the story about the business with 12 Million followers, I want to start by discussing a Facebook ad about the “truth around building an audience” that drives me bonkers every time I see it, so I decided to share my analysis around why I think it’s extremely misleading (and could even be dangerous to your financial and business health).

In a nutshell, the ad makes the claim that if you have a business, building an audience is a waste of time. You should immediately stop all of that blogging and podcasting and shooting videos nonsense, and instead, just follow this particular guru’s simple formula to immediately fill your business with high-paying clients. No audience required.

Simple as that. No mess, no fuss.

Now, a few disclaimers before I get into my analysis. First off, while yes, I’ve obviously read the ad, I have not actually watched this person’s webinar, so I don’t know what his simple formula actually is. If I were to guess, I would assume he teaches how to use some form of paid ads (most likely Facebook ads) to attract prospects into a funnel that ends in a sales call.

If that’s what he’s teaching, it’s perfectly legitimate, and I’m sure it does work.

I’m also a big believer that businesses should be profitable and make money for their owner. If his system works as advertised, the fact that he’s selling it isn’t the problem.

It drives me bonkers because it’s incomplete. And because the claim the ad makes is incomplete, it has the potential to hurt entrepreneurs.

Here’s the truth:

In order to have a successful, profitable business, you need both long-term and short-term marketing strategies.

Long-term marketing strategies are for audience and platform building. That includes those pesky tactics such as blogging and list building.

Short-term strategies are to generate cash now. So, any type of sale emails or, in the case of this Facebook ad, a paid advertising strategy designed to generate prospects so you can close them on a sales call.

Focusing mostly on long-term strategies (especially before you’ve built up a big platform) could lead to big time cash flow challenges.

Focusing on short-term strategies could lead to a massive feast/famine financial cycle. Plus, if your short-term marketing strategy stops working for some reason, you could lose your entire business.

The Internet is littered with stories about entrepreneurs who built their platform around (or had most of their income coming from) one source, and when that source dried up, their business tanked—sometimes as fast as overnight.

This is especially true if your short-term marketing strategy is linked to something you don’t control. For instance, let’s look at this strategy of using Facebook ads to close high-ticket clients.

* What if Facebook suddenly jacks up the rate of those ads overnight. How will you then get a high enough return on your investment, to make this particular strategy worth it? (Yes, I’ve seen this happen.)

* What if Facebook bans you from advertising? (Yes, I’ve seen this happen.)

* What if something happens to Facebook? (As I write this, Mark Zuckenburg is testifying in front of Congress about Facebook’s privacy policy. What if Congress decides to regulate? What if Facebook becomes less popular?)

Now, maybe none of these “what ifs” actually happen, but the point here is that you don’t know.

Things change at lightning speed in the age of the Internet, which means if you aren’t spending time building your presence on a platform you control (such as a blog or website) in addition to building your audience and growing your subscriber list, the more vulnerable you are.

It doesn’t matter if you have thousands of followers on your Facebook page or YouTube channel. You have no way of contacting them if Facebook or YouTube changes the rules.

Which means, if the rules DO get changed, you’ve just lost your audience.

For example, there was once a little publishing company that built up a Facebook following of 12 MILLION followers. They posted daily videos that were liked and shared and followed.

Then one day, Facebook changed their algorithms to show more posts from personal contacts than businesses, and they lost over 75% of their organic traffic.

Just. Like. That.

That little publishing company didn’t recover. It went out of business.

The worst part of this story is it didn’t have to happen. This company had a ton of content. Why wasn’t it posted on YouTube? (At least then there would have been a second platform to turn to.) Why wasn’t it posted on a company blog?

In this case, the work was already done. It wouldn’t have taken much effort at all to put a little love into building up a couple of other platforms. It wouldn’t have taken much to invite their Facebook fans to opt in to an email list.

But, it wasn’t a priority for them to build a platform outside of Facebook. Likely, the owners never even considered that Facebook would change the rules overnight. Maybe they even thought it was a waste of time and energy to do anything else, when they were getting so much traction and momentum from Facebook.

Anyway, let’s get back to you.

As a busy entrepreneur (who maybe doesn’t even like marketing all that much), you may be reading this right now while experiencing sinking feeling in your stomach.

Where will you find the time and energy to create both long-term AND short-term marketing strategies?

Well, here’s my answer—you get help.

I’m a big believer in focusing your time, energy, and love on what you most enjoy. Find the marketing tactic you love and do that. (My “Love-Based Online Marketing” book includes a “Love Your Marketing Assessment” that can help.)

You also may need to put some time into the cash flow part of your business as well, to make sure it’s running smoothly.

Then, hire a team member (or members) to help with the long-term marketing strategies.

You don’t have to do it fast, or dedicate a lot of time to it. If all you can handle right now is a weekly article, then do a weekly article (or a weekly podcast or video).

Commit to what you can. And budget what you can to get help.

And, take a deep breath. You’re in this for the long haul, right? So, know the long-term marketing strategy may take a little longer to see results, but at the end of the day, you WILL have a stronger, more stable and more profitable business because of it.

And, if you’d like to dig more deeply into online marketing, including putting together an online marketing plan, my “Love-Based Online Marketing” book may be perfect for you.

[Video] Your Success: Are You Taking it For Granted?

[Video] Your Success: Are You Taking it For Granted?

As many of you may know, we just had the Winter Olympics, and the US women’s hockey team beat the odds and won the gold.

So, because I live in America, there are inevitable references to that famous Miracle on Ice game.

If you don’t know the story, here’s the cliff notes version. In 1980, the US men’s hockey team beat the Russians. Now, that may not sound like a big deal, but at the time, the US men’s hockey team was something of a longstanding joke.

That’s because if you were a professional athlete, you were barred from competing in the Olympics. So, no NHL players. Instead, the US would field a team of a bunch of college kids.

The Russians, however, for all practical purposes had their professional hockey team in the Olympics. Yes they weren’t technically professionals, but Russia had found a way to get around that rule.

This particular Russian team was really good. All it did was win. The players had been together for years and they had won virtually every game they played.

Until they ran into the buzzsaw of those college kids in the Olympics.

You may have seen some of the pictures from that Olympics, specifically the famous Sports Illustrated cover that showed the pure chaotic joy of the players celebrating on the ice.

But, what isn’t talked about as much is what the Russians were doing.

They had gathered together on their side of the ice and were standing there watching the Americans lose their minds.

I saw a documentary about the Miracle on Ice, and filmmakers had interviewed one of the Russian players. They asked him what he, and the rest of the team, was thinking at the time.

The player said, and I’m paraphrasing, they were watching the Americans because they had won so often and for so long, it had become expected. They no longer felt joy when they won a game. They had forgotten the joy of winning and watching the Americans brought that back to them.

Now, I’d like to bring this back to you and your business. Is there some successful part of your business that has become so expected, so routine, you’re taking it for granted?

I’m not talking about your entire business, just one part. For instance, maybe you get a crazy high open rate. Or maybe you have really good organic traffic to your blog. Or maybe you have a popular podcast with a lot of downloads.

Never mind if you’ve figured out how to monetize it yet. Are you seeing some level of success that you’re now expecting and taking for granted and no longer celebrating when it happens?

If we’re forever stuck in this energy of “not enough” or “well sure this is good but look at this other list of everything that sucks,” how can we possibly open ourselves up to receive bigger levels of success?

In fact, that’s one of the secrets of a gratitude practice. Being grateful for what you have opens you up to receive even more.

So, I’d like to encourage you to take a moment and celebrate the small successes of your business. Especially anything you used to celebrate and you don’t anymore because it’s happened so often you are now taking it for granted.

(And if you’re wondering exactly how you can get everything you want simply by flipping your perspective? Check out the first episode here.)

If you liked this episode, you may also like my “Love-Based Money and Mindset” book.