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The Future of Copywriting: 5 Copywriting Trends to Watch For

The Future of Copywriting: 5 Copywriting Trends to Watch For

I’m back with my crystal ball (aka angel snow globe) with a few predictions on copywriting trends to watch for in the wacky world of copywriting over the coming year.

But, before I dig into those copywriting trends, let’s define what copywriting is.

Copywriting is writing promotional materials for businesses, nothing to do with protecting intellectual property or putting a copyright on something (notice the difference in spelling).

My specialty is a subset called “direct response copywriting,” which entails crafting copy that your ideal prospects directly respond to. For example, when you write an email asking your community to click on a link, you’re writing direct response copy. Those long sales letters you’re scrolling down forever, all-the-while asking yourself, “How much does this actually cost?” and wondering if anyone actually ever reads those things anyway … yep. That’s direct response.

(And by the way, the short answer is yes—people read them.)

The Internet is littered with direct response copy, mainly because it’s a fabulous way to leverage yourself and your marketing efforts, especially when you’re using the Internet to market yourself. Direct response copy does the selling for you, so you can market and sell yourself one to many.

But, as much good as it does, people still hate it. That’s partially because traditional direct response copy uses a lot of fear-based triggers (which doesn’t feel very good). It’s also because a lot of people just hate writing, and would rather not do it at all. (It’s okay if this is you, we’re all friends here.)

Needless to say, there’s a lot of misinformation around the future of copy, so I thought I’d take a moment to sort out the facts from the fiction—and what better way to do that than by talking about five copywriting trends I see happening now?

Without further ado, let’s dig into those copywriting trends.

Trend 1. Copywriting isn’t going away (and yes, that includes writing email copy). Yep, I hear those proclamations too: “Email is dead. Facebook is the place to be. No, maybe it’s videos. Or podcasts. Or …”

So, first off, nothing beats building your own sandbox versus playing in other people’s sandboxes. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be using Facebook and Youtube—you absolutely should have a presence on any platform your ideal prospects are on.

You just shouldn’t build your entire business on them.

An excellent way to market and build your business is to spend time in the places your ideal clients are hanging out, with the intent to inspire them to join you in your sandbox.

Ideally you’d love for them to join your email list, so you have permission to reach out when the timing is right for you. But, even if they regularly visit your blog or have subscribed to your podcast, that’s a step in the right direction, too.

And, for any of that to happen, it’s important to have harnessed the power of copy in your marketing. No, that doesn’t mean YOU need to do all the writing yourself—hiring it out is perfectly acceptable. But, you need to come to terms with the fact that as long as you own a business, you’re going to be generating copy (and likely a lot of it).

And that leads us to the second of the five copywriting trends.

Trend 2. Connecting with your ideal clients is key to future success. There was a time in the not-so-distant past when you could generate an awful lot of money simply by harnessing the power of “new” in your marketing.

That time has come and gone (and frankly, I don’t think it’s a bad thing, as I would argue very few entrepreneurs who had mastered the power of “new” actually had a solid, sustainable business.)

So, if you can’t use “new” to attract customers, clients and buyers, what can you do?

Easy. Focus on connecting and building relationships with your prospects. (And, if you are looking to attract more ideal clients to your business, connecting and building relationships is hands down the best strategy to use).

Copy is one of the best ways to connect and build relationships, especially when you use it in an email. (Emails are one-to-one medium: people are getting emails in their inbox, so by it’s very nature, it’s a personal connection. It’s just a matter of you remembering that, when you craft emails to your subscribers.)

But, this is just the first step to building more rapport with your ideal prospects.

Trend 3. Focus on giving your prospects exactly what they want. And I guarantee what they want is plenty of content, and maybe even to be entertained.

What they DON’T want? To be sold to constantly.

That’s why so many entrepreneurs have email lists that are, for all practical purposes, dead. They’ve sold to them so much that their prospects have stopped interacting with them.

(Note: Constantly sending your subscribers to other people’s “free” launch content, such as free books or videos or webinars, constitutes selling. Yes, yes, I know the content is usually pretty solid. But, it’s still designed to sell a program, likely a high-ticket item, and anyone who says “yes” to that free content WILL get inundated with emails for a few weeks. Your subscribers know this, and are tuning it out. I’m not saying not to promote other people’s launches or to stop doing your own; I absolutely still believe product launches are an important tool in your marketing toolbox. However, what I AM saying is to count those emails toward your “total sales emails” quota. You only have so many sales emails you can send to your list before they stop paying attention, so choose wisely.)

Your subscribers don’t mind some sales emails, but it’s important to balance those sales emails with what they’re really looking for, which is most likely content and entertainment.

But, there’s an even bigger prediction on the horizon (a.k.a. the fourth of five copywriting trends)…

Trend 4. Segmenting is the future. While this is a more advanced tactic, having a way to segment your subscribers and allow THEM to decide what sort of content and communication they want from you is going to become more and more important.

I’ve seen stats showing far better results when emails are tailored to your subscribers based on their answers to a few questions you ask them.

So, how do you do this? Some email programs, such as Infusion Soft (although there are cheaper email software programs that are coming out now that are offering these options) allow you to “tag” your subscribers depending on if they click a link, or how they answer a question. You can then send an email to just the people who were tagged.

For instance, maybe you send out an email asking, “If you’re brand new to business, click here,” you can then “tag” everyone who clicks on that link. Now you have a segmented list of new entrepreneurs, and you can send them content and offers that are tailored specifically to them.

See how powerful that can be?

It’s always been the case that the more you can speak directly to your ideal prospects concerns and what’s keeping them up at night, the more they’ll buy from you. Until the Internet, it was far more complicated to give them tailored offers.

Of course, this is a bit of a catch-22. Now that it is easier, it’s likely your ideal prospects will be expecting it more. Which means if you’re NOT segmenting, you could be losing potential clients, customers and buyers.

But, there’s still one last of the 5 copywriting trends that will also be important when it comes to writing copy.

Trend 5. Use passion, vulnerability, and stories in your copy. Remember, people want to do business with people. And, you connecting and building relationships with your ideal prospects is going to be even more important now, as it truly is one of the top trends in marketing and business.

One key way to connect with them using copy is to do things like tap into your passion, and show your personality. Reveal your vulnerabilities and share stories in your copy.

As humans, we’re wired to respond to stories. So, the more we can use stories in our marketing, the more our ideal prospects will pay attention to us. And, if they’re paying attention, they’re far more likely to become buyers, customers, and clients.

I know it can feel strange to use stories and share your vulnerabilities (business IS supposed to be professional after all, and if you came from corporate, it can feel even more alien), but sharing something you’re vulnerable about can go a long way in making you far more relatable.

And, now, for a last, bonus prediction (because 6 copywriting trends didn’t sound nearly as sexy as five).

Bonus Trend 6. Fear-based copy that focuses on shaming and scarcity is on its way out, and love-based copy is the new black. So, as the founder of the love-based copy philosophy and the love-based business movement, I get that this might seem more than a little self-serving.

It’s also not completely true.


While fear-based copy and marketing DOES still work, it’s definitely not working as well as it used to. I do believe it’s on its way out, and selling and marketing yourself with love is on its way in, but we’re not quite there yet.

As a species, we still psychologically respond to fear-based triggers. The more we do the inner work and shift to building our businesses and living our lives on a foundation of love, the less fear-based triggers will work.

And, if you want to dig into love-based copy at an even deeper level, you may want to check out my books: Love-Based Copywriting Method: The Philosophy Behind Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites and Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites.


Creative Copy on Thriving Launch Podcast

Creative Copy on Thriving Launch Podcast

I recently had the pleasure of being interviewed on the Thriving Launch Podcast. You can check out my interview below, that includes some really juicy tips on writing love-based copy.

 Want more love-based copy? Check out the books that started it all:
3 Hard Truths About Building Your Online Influence

3 Hard Truths About Building Your Online Influence

There’s no better way to grow your business online than by growing your influence.

When you’ve built a strong online influence, it likely looks like you have a large online community who follows you. For instance, maybe you have a big email list or lots of Facebook followers or a popular blog or podcast or Youtube channel. (Or a combination of the above.)

And, of course when you have that, it’s so much easier to build a successful, profitable business.

But, having online influence is more than just collecting followers on the various social networks. It also means people are actually reading your words and listening to your message.

And, when that happens, it’s truly magic. Because then you’re in a position to share your gifts and message in a much bigger way.

And when you want to make a big difference in the world, who wouldn’t want to have an influence?

The problem, of course, is how … how do you do it? How do you grow your online influence (especially if you’re just starting out), and do it in a way that’s authentic and doesn’t feel slimy, or like you’re twisting people’s arms? (In other words, how can you do it in a love-based way?)

Well, while it’s not particularly complicated or difficult to develop and grow your online influence, it DOES take some work. And you also need to accept a few hard truths. Let’s take a look at three of them:

1. It’s an inside job. Learning the latest, hot new way to attract followers on whatever platform you’re focusing on isn’t actually going to build your influence.

If you want to inspire people to make positive changes in their life, then you need to be very clear on who YOU are—what your expertise is, what your business is about, who you serve, etc.

This inner work can be tough—I get it. But, the clearer you are, the more people will be able to decide if you’re someone they want to listen to, and become a part of your community.

The less clear you are, the more likely people will ignore you—not because they aren’t interested in what you have to say, but because they’re too busy to try and figure out if you’re someone they want to pay attention to.

2. Be authentic. People are savvy. They can sense if you’re walking your walk, or if you’re just telling people to do one thing while you do something else.

And, there’s nothing that has less influence than a hypocrite.

The more you and your business are in alignment with your message, the more influence you’re going to have.

At the bare minimum, it’s important to reflect what you offer in your business. So, if you’re in the health industry, make sure your health habits mirror what you teach. If you teach marketing, make sure your own marketing is in order.

But, you may want to look deeper. Are you someone who pays your team and other contractors on time? Do you believe in investing in yourself (since you’re asking others to invest in themselves through you)?

It may not seem like this would move the needle much, but it really does. If you believe in Law of Attraction, you know that the more you have your own act together, the more the Universe will deliver to you. But, even if you don’t, if affects how YOU are showing up. If you’re out of integrity, it likely will show up in YOUR energy, which people will sense even if they never say anything or are even completely aware of it. And that will affect how people see you, and their willingness to be in your community.

3. It’s going to take time. Ah, this one is tough. Building online influence isn’t going to happen overnight. It might not even happen in six months. Or a year.

People need time—time to get to know you. To see if they like what you’re about. To see if they resonate with your message. To see if they resonate with YOU.

To make things worse, all of this happens on THEIR time, not yours. You need to land some clients because you need money for next month? Tough. No one is going to be compelled to follow you (much less buy your products and programs) because you need the money.

There is no question this is a long-tailed marketing strategy, which by definition means it’s going to take time … BUT once it happens, it will start to take on a life of its own.

If you want to dig deeper into marketing your business, you may want to check out my “Love-Based Online Marketing” book—you can get it here.


[Video] Flip It! That Long Copy Sales Letter Doesn’t Actually Work, Does It?

[Video] Flip It! That Long Copy Sales Letter Doesn’t Actually Work, Does It?

First off, what exactly is a long copy sales letter? Those are those web site pages where you scroll down and down for like forever trying to find the price and asking yourself “who reads these things anyway?”

Yeah. Those are the ones.

The short answer is yes, those long copy sales letter do in fact, make sales, even if you personally find them annoying.

And there are a few reasons why they work.

First, people need information to make a decision on whether or not they’re going to purchase something. A sales letter gives them that information. They need to get clear on what it is they’re buying and if it will, in fact, solve the issue that’s keeping them up at night.

The only way they’re going to know that is through words, and sometimes a lot of them.

Imagine yourself on a sales call. Let’s say it takes you 30 minutes to have a conversation and make a sale. If you were to transcribe that conversation, it would probably be around 10-12 pages or so, depending on how fast you both talked.

So, now let’s imagine yourself on a different sales call. Maybe you cover some of the same things you covered in the first call but you’re also answering different questions. If you create a transcript from the new information, maybe that’s adding another 6 pages. So, now you’re up to 16-18 pages.

Now you’re on a third call and you are answering still other questions.

I think you see where I’m going with this.

A sales letter is actually an effective way to answer all the different questions all your different prospects have about your products and services. It’s actually quite efficient when you consider most sales pages are less than one transcribed sales call.

This is also why the more expensive your product or program is, the longer your sales page typically becomes — because the more expensive something is, the more questions you have.

And, make no mistake, people need to have their questions answered before they’ll make the purchase. A confused mind doesn’t buy, nor does a mind that has a lot of questions.

In addition, the more time your prospects spend reading your content, listening to your podcasts, watching your videos or reviewing your marketing materials, the more likely they’ll end up investing with you. That has to do with the know, like and trust factor — the more they get to know you, the more they’ll start to like and trust you. And people want to do business with people they know like or trust.

If you’re still uncomfortable with the idea of the long copy sales letter, watch below for some tips on flipping your perspective:

(Wondering exactly how you can get everything you want simply by flipping your perspective? Check out the first episode here.)

If you liked this episode, you may also like my Love-Based Copy books: Love-Based Copywriting Method and Love-Based Copywriting System, both available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, iTunes and other online retailers.

What the Food Network Can Teach You About Marketing Your Business

What the Food Network Can Teach You About Marketing Your Business

First, a confession. Yes, I’m into food porn.

No, I can’t cook (I’m not very good at it, nor do I enjoy it at all), but for some reason, I really enjoy watching other people cook. I especially love the cooking competition shows (probably my love of sports kicking in here).

One of the shows I watch from time to time is Chopped. If you haven’t seen it, four chefs compete to cook the best dish using four mystery ingredients. There are three rounds, and a chef is “chopped” after each round.

During the show, we get to meet and listen to the judges, and for the most part, I haven’t liked any of them. To me, their personalities have ranged from flat and uninteresting to downright grumpy.

Now, that didn’t stop me from watching the show. But I certainly wasn’t going to go out of my way to watch those judges anywhere else.

But that all changed when I saw several of those judges compete against each other on a different cooking show. Instead of being flat and grumpy, they were having fun and cracking jokes.

In other words, I saw their personality.

Now, when I see them on Chopped, I no longer see the dour judges I used to. My view of them now is more well-rounded, and I actually enjoying them.

I suspect you can all see where I’m going with all of this.

The more you share your personality in your marketing, the more people will feel they know you. And once they get to know you, they’re in position to like you—and we’d all rather do business with people we know, like, and trust.

In a nutshell:

So, what are the best ways to share your personality in your marketing?

In no particular order, here’s 5 ways to get started:

* Share stories from your life. From what’s going on with your kids and your pets to your latest vacations.

* Share your hopes and dreams. What do you really want in life? What are you currently working toward? What are you passionate about? There’s a good chance your ideal clients want to join you on your journey, but they can only join you if they know where you’re going.

* Share your rants. Is there something that really makes you angry? Or do you have a contradictory view on what’s considered standard in your industry? Share it. However, I would caution you to try and avoid sounding preachy or judgmental. It’s one thing to get all fired up about an issue, it’s quite another to turn it into a condescending sermon.

* Share your vulnerabilities. Talk about when you made a mistake or fell flat on your face. (But, important note—if you’re in the middle of a massive “black night of the soul,” it may be prudent to wait until you’re through it before you share it.)

* Develop your unique voice in your writing—the more people can feel you in your copy, the more compelling they’ll find your copy. (My second love-based business book “Love-Based Copywriting System” contains resources to help you cultivate your personality and your voice in your writing.)

If you’re uncomfortable sharing your personality in your marketing, my advice is to go slowly. Share something small, and see what happens. The more you do it, the easier it gets.

Want more copy tips? You may like my Love-Based Copywriting books (Volume 1 and Volume 2).

Email Writing Tips for Effective Emails, Part 2

Email Writing Tips for Effective Emails, Part 2

Note: This is the second post in a two-post series, where I’m sharing my favorite email writing tips that convert prospects into buyers or leads into customers. For Part 1, go here.

By now, you know it’s important to use email to connect with your potential buyers on a personal, authentic level. When you do that effectively, your emails convert: readers take the actions you want them to take.

That’s why this series has focused on email writing tips to encourage people to open your emails, feel engaged with what you’ve written, read all the way through AND take some kind of action.

Now, let’s dive into the next three email writing tips that are designed to help you get your emails read from start to finish—or from subject line to PS!

Tip 4. Make Your Emails Personal.

The reason email works so well is that it is personal by nature. Your communication is like a letter to each of your community members. So when you’re writing an email, pretend you’re writing a letter to one specific person. When you master this, each of your ideal prospects will feel like you’ve written specifically to him or her. When they get the sense that you’ve taken the time and energy to focus on them and write something that matters to them, they’ll reward you by opening and reading your emails.

Tip 5. Write Great Subject Lines.

Think about it: when you’re looking at that long list of emails in your inbox, you’re filtering: deciding which ones you’ll trash immediately, which ones you’ll read later, and which ones you’ll read right away. How do you make those decisions? You look at the subject lines. So, what makes subject lines great, or effective?

  • Being specific. If you have a deadline coming up, or a webinar showing on a certain date, include that in your subject line.
  • Being a little “off-the-wall” or invoking curiosity. Some examples are, “Winter is coming,” or, “It worked … kind of.”
  • Mixing it up. If, in most cases, you write straightforward subject lines, try throwing in a few “off-the-wall” subject lines every few emails. Or, if you typically write mysterious subject lines, throw in a few straightforward subject lines here and there. This may help you cut through the email clutter.

Tip 6. Write Powerful PS’s.

Did you know that it’s extremely common for a reader to skip from the top of an email straight to the PS? In fact, the PS is known to be the second-most-commonly-read element in an email (behind the subject line). So this is “hot real estate” in your emails! There are several different ways to write a powerful PS — to get you started, I’ve included a few email writing tips below:

  • Address an objection. The most common objections people have when buying your product or service are time and money. They’re not sure whether they can afford the time or financial investment. So think about what you can say to overcome those objections.
  • Share one of your clients’ real-life success stories. Whether you summarize the story in your own words, or insert a quote from one of your clients, this is a powerful way to illustrate that you’re helping people get great results.
  • Position the reader’s choice about whether to invest with you as a choice to remain in their current situation, or to move forward and get the results you can provide them.
  • Recap a juicy benefit of the product or service you’re selling. For example, set it up as an “imagine” statement: “Imagine finally knowing exactly what to do when it comes to your marketing, rather than feeling overwhelmed and uncertain of what to do, when.”

In Conclusion …

I think the best part about writing effective emails is that it’s fun! It’s fun to be yourself, share with your community, and build relationships that thrive as your business does.

If this topic resonates with you, you may be interested in my book, “Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites.” It’s available here.

Tips for Writing an Effective Email, Part 1

Tips for Writing an Effective Email, Part 1

Note: This is the first post in a two-post series, where I’m sharing my favorite strategies for writing an effective email that convert prospects into buyers or leads into customers.

In today’s world—the world of building businesses online—most entrepreneurs understand that building an email list is extremely important.

An email list is one of the best ways to build your business because it gives you the opportunity to connect with potential buyers on a personal, authentic level.

But (you knew that was coming, right?) an effective email is only as effective as your open and click-through rates.

If nobody’s opening your emails, and nobody’s clicking on the links you put in them, then your email list is not actually working to build your business.

And that can be discouraging.

It takes lots of time, energy, mental power, and money to build a list and to write content regularly.

So today, I’m going to share three of my favorite tips for writing an effective email that converts (and I’ll share three more in my next post, so be sure to check back in a few days).

Tip 1. Make Sure Your Emails Are Mobile-Friendly.

I know. It sounds pretty obvious. Also, emails not being mobile-friendly doesn’t really sound like a deal-breaker, right? Wrong.

Here’s the thing: an increasing number of studies and statistics show that a growing number of people use phones and tablets to shop (not computers). In fact, one of the reports I read said that up to 70% of sales happen on phones or tablets.

If your emails look “off” or load improperly and aren’t easy to read, your readers are going to click “delete,” period.

So here are some mobile-friendly-related considerations to make as you create and compose your emails:

  • Whether to use a banner. Recently, I’ve noticed that entrepreneurs see better conversion rates when they do not use a banner.
  • The user experience: technically. People reading on teeny tiny mobile devices are more likely to skim than people who read on computers. Make it easy for people to consume your emails by incorporating white space, shorter paragraphs, and shorter sentences.
  • The user experience: emotionally. Be sure to think about how your subscribers feel when they get your email. They’re living, breathing, busy people, so give them something worthwhile.

Tip 2. Make Your Emails Easy-to-Read and Understand.

As I mentioned above, your ideal prospects are likely skimming your email. That being said, is it easy for them to follow what you’re saying? Are you using words they quickly and easily understand?

Are you making them think too hard?

Of course, I’m not saying you should “dumb down” your message. But you should also be sure to use language that your ideal prospects use (not jargon from your industry).

On another note, be crystal clear about which action you want your readers to take. Set links apart so readers know exactly where to click. If it’s not crystal clear, your readers likely won’t take action at all.

One of my favorite tips for creating a crystal clear call to action is to start with the end in mind. Before you even start writing the email, be clear in your own mind about which action you want readers to take—whether it’s to enroll in your new course, buy your book, or read your newest blog post.

Building your email that call to action is a great way to make sure you’ve just created an effective email. And don’t forget to keep it simple!

Tip 3. Connect with Your Ideal Prospects.

Your community is unique. It’s important to ensure you are connecting with the members of your community on a personal level.

Here are a couple of examples:

I’m on a list where the business owner writes very long emails a few times each week. To be honest, although I’m seeing better conversion rates with shorter emails, this entrepreneur’s emails are entertaining—a great mix of content and stories from his life.

And, they always include some kind of offer at the end.

I’d typically caution entrepreneurs against sending out too many sales emails, but this particular business owner has it nailed: I am certain he gets a lot of email opens and a lot of click-throughs because his emails are informative and entertaining!

One of my clients has had a great response from shorter, punchier emails that have a kind of “hook.” She’s often directing people to read her blog posts, and she makes her emails short and sweet and to the point. Although this effort is the opposite of the one I explained in the first example, it works!

It’s all about knowing what your ideal prospects want from you.

In Conclusion…

The next time you sit down to write an effective email, I’d encourage you to keep these tips in mind. When your emails are easy to read, when they are easy to understand, and when they resonate with the members of your community, you’ll see your conversion numbers improve.

And your business will grow as a result.

Check out Part 2 and the next 3 tips right here.

Meanwhile, if this topic resonates with you, you may be interested in my book, “Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites.” It’s available here.

Want More Clients? Here’s My Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist

Want More Clients? Here’s My Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist

Is there a secret “magical” button to getting clients?

I get this question a lot. And it makes sense — getting clients is the lifeblood for all businesses. But how do you do it?

Of course, there are a ton of answers. But because you’re here, I suspect you’re looking for proven ways to get new ideal clients in a love-based way … using methods that feel good to you and the people you’re hoping to attract.

That being said, let’s dive into my Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist:

• Know who your ideal clients are. 

Before you can attract your ideal client, you need to know who he or she is. And the best place to start is to get very clear on who your ideal client is (because your ideal client is different from your target market or niche).

• Know what is keeping your ideal clients up at night.

What, specifically, is bothering your ideal client? Does she want to make a big impact on this world? Is he searching for purpose? Is he tired of working double-full-time hours to make a part-time income? Is she exhausted from being in pain?

You must be able to dial in on their specific pain if you expect to be able to communicate how your product or service will help your ideal client.

• Know how your product or service solves this pain. 

How, exactly, does your product or service solve your ideal client’s main problem? For example, does it give her a process or system to reach the people she wants to serve? Does it give him clarity about his purpose? Does it offer a method for boosting his income while working fewer hours? Is it a new solution to help her get out of pain?

• Properly communicate how your product or service will solve your ideal client’s problems. 

Touch on pain, but don’t twist the knife.

Many heart-centered or spiritual entrepreneurs shy away from using pain in their marketing copy because it makes them feel “icky” or arm-twisty. But I’m a big proponent of using pain—respectfully—because it’s a great way to show your ideal prospects that you understand what they’re going through and that you can help them.

Of course, you don’t want to use fear-based emotions like shame or guilt when you’re mentioning their pain, and don’t use your copy to agitate their pain to the level of suffering!

Use your ideal clients’ language, not your own.

Don’t try to be cutesy when it comes to writing your copy. Instead, use the very same words and phrases your ideal clients would use. If you’re not sure what those words and phrases are, ask your ideal clients. Survey them, or ask them on your social networking channels or Internet groups.

Know where your ideal clients hang out, online and offline—and then hang out there, too. 

The first step to knowing where your ideal clients hang out is to get to know them on a really deep level. Once you know, you need to ramp up your presence in those places … even if they aren’t your favorite places (because you are not necessarily your own ideal client). If your ideal clients don’t have the chance to get to know you, by hanging out with you, then you’re going to have a tough time convincing them to work with you.

Connect with your ideal clients when you meet them—without trying to “sell” them.

When you meet your ideal clients, connect with them on a personal level. You may share your expertise or answer questions. Or, you may discuss your favorite books or TV shows, or your pets or hobbies. You may discuss your family life, your favorite city to visit, or your favorite foods. Letting people in on who you are is a huge element of the know, like, trust factor.

• Be accessible and visible, consistently.

It’s simple math: the more you’re “out and about,” whether it’s virtually or at networking events, the more opportunities you create to connect with your ideal clients. So whether you are going to networking events, hanging out online, or whatever you choose to do, be consistent about it.

• Follow up with the people who raised their hands and said they were interested in getting to know you or work with you.

Lack of follow-up is like leaving money on the table. Keep in mind that in today’s society, we’re all receiving countless messages every day. The volume is so great that many people don’t even hear these messages! So follow-up is key—again, it provides you with more opportunities to ensure your ideal prospects remember you, and remember why they were interested in the first place.

The more you get yourself out there, the more you share your voice, your personality, and your expertise, the higher the chances that you’ll land in front of your ideal prospects and ideal clients!

So, that’s the Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist — use it anytime you want to jumpstart getting clients in the door.

If this topic resonated with you, you may be interested in “Love-Based Copywriting Method: The Philosophy Behind Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites.” It’s available at most online retailers. Learn more, here.


How to Craft a Compelling Message That Gets You Results

How to Craft a Compelling Message That Gets You Results

When it comes to marketing, do you ever feel invisible? As if no one is paying the slightest attention to your message?

You’re spending all of this time writing marketing copy, emails, social media posts, blog posts, and website posts and they’re falling on deaf ears?

No matter how hard you work, how much blood, sweat, and tears go into your writing, your ideal prospects just aren’t buying.

If this sounds familiar, you’re in luck. Today, I’m sharing my advice for crafting a compelling message that converts your ideal prospects into ideal clients.

Your ideal clients see you and hear you and know you. And to know you is to love you, right?


So let’s get started.

A compelling message comprises two important elements: your ideal clients and your offer.

You’ll find your compelling message where those two elements intersect.

Ideal Clients

I’m a big believer in the power of identifying an ideal client as opposed to a target market or niche.

Whereas target markets and niches are based on external factors/demographics, ideal clients are based on internal factors like desires and fears.

Here’s my favorite illustration of this distinction:

A target market might be stay-at-home moms. A niche within that target market could be stay-at-home moms looking for a work-from-home opportunity.

And within that niche lies an ideal client.

For example, one stay-at-home mom may be looking for a work-from-home opportunity because she needs to contribute financially to her household. Her family needs two incomes to pay the bills.

Another stay-at-home mom may be looking for a work-from-home opportunity because she wants something of her own; she wants to use her professional skills, and she wants to develop an identity separate from that of a mother or wife.

Take a moment to think about the difference between the mindsets of those two women. Two completely different ideas are keeping them up at night.

In the first example, the mom is worried about paying the bills. And in the second, she wants to develop a new aspect of her identity.

So when it comes to messaging, your message to each of these women would be completely different.

People respond to specifics. So it’s important that your message address the specific worries or fears of your ideal client. The more specific you are in describing their unique situation, the more they’ll feel like you’re speaking directly to them; that you understand them. And the more they feel like you understand them, the more they’ll believe your offer will help them.

Now, if you aren’t sure what’s keeping your ideal client up at night, ask! Send out a survey or hang out where they hang out—Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.—and be a great listener.

Your Offer

Once you understand specifically what’s keeping your ideal client up at night, you can craft your offer so it’s clear you will solve his or her specific problem.

The best way to illustrate this is with an example.

One of my longtime clients, The Coaches Console, provides coaches with an all-inclusive software that streamlines and automates all the back-end elements of a coaching business: marketing, lead generation, client conversion, client enrollment and agreement, client support, scheduling, client notes … everything!

So what keeps their ideal clients up at night? They want to make a difference in the world. They’re passionate about coaching. But they find the business side of coaching overwhelming.

So The Coaches Console’s offer is their software—which solves their ideal client’s problem by taking all the guesswork and overwhelm out of the business side of coaching so that their ideal clients can focus on what they love best: coaching.

The Intersection: Your Compelling Message

So now you know what keeps your ideal client up at night. And you know what your offer is, and how you position it as a solution to what keeps your ideal client up at night.

It’s time to create your compelling message.

Let’s look at the three ideal client examples I’ve addressed in this post:

Stay-at-home moms who need to make money. These women are up at night because they need an income. So if you’re offering them a business opportunity, your compelling message would be: “I provide stay-at-home moms an opportunity to make a reliable income while still having time to take care of their families.”

Stay-at-home moms who want an identity separate from wife and/or mom. These women are up at night because they want to do something of their own. So if you’re offering them a business opportunity, your compelling message would be: “I provide stay-at-home moms an opportunity to have fun as entrepreneurs while still being there for their family members.”

Coaches who love coaching but are overwhelmed by the business details. These coaches are up at night because they want to focus on coaching and want to run a profitable business—but don’t necessarily have the business acumen to do so. So if you’re offering them a software to take care of all those business details, your compelling message would be: “We give coaches the tools they need to streamline and automate their businesses so they can focus on coaching.”

Your message, which happens at the intersection of Your Ideal Client and Your Offer, will be compelling once you make it clear that you will solve your ideal client’s specific problem.

If you are ready to start writing your compelling message, spend some time getting to know your ideal client and what keeps her up at night. Spend some time crafting your offer as the unique solution to that problem. And that, my friends, is where your compelling message is born.

If this topic resonated with you, you may be interested in Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process To Master Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites. It’s available at most online retailers. Learn more, here.



[Revamped] Why Isn’t My Website Making Me Any Money?

[Revamped] Why Isn’t My Website Making Me Any Money?

Ever since 2014, when God/Universe downloaded the entire love-based copy philosophy into me, I’ve realized that one of my missions in life is to spread the word that you have a choice.

You don’t have to use traditional, fear-based methods to promote and grow your business — you CAN choose love instead.

But, I also realized I needed to do more than simply educate people on the love-based philosophy. I also need to help entrepreneurs, such as yourself, take specific action steps so they actually can build and run their business successfully from a place of love. (Because, quite honestly, if you aren’t making money selling with love, then there’s a problem we need to fix.)

Which brings me to this post — to help you take those action steps, I’ve been working behind the scenes on a few projects, including revamping one of my bestselling products “Why Isn’t My Website Making Me Any Money? 10 Easy Steps To Create a Website You Love AND that Loves You Back.”

Check it out!

If you’re not happy with your website on any level, this little product can help you pinpoint the problem and get you back on track … and do it from a place of love.

It includes brand new bonuses (such as my “6 Steps to Crafting a Hot Freebie Perfect for Your Ideal Clients So You Build Your List AND Sell Your Products/Programs/Services”) AND a brand new Website Checklist, to make it even easier to help you get to the bottom of what’s off with your website.

Check it out and see if it’s what you need to move your business forward.