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Category: Love-Based Marketing

What the Food Network Can Teach You About Marketing Your Business

What the Food Network Can Teach You About Marketing Your Business

First, a confession. Yes, I’m into food porn.

No, I can’t cook (I’m not very good at it, nor do I enjoy it at all), but for some reason, I really enjoy watching other people cook. I especially love the cooking competition shows (probably my love of sports kicking in here).

One of the shows I watch from time to time is Chopped. If you haven’t seen it, four chefs compete to cook the best dish using four mystery ingredients. There are three rounds, and a chef is “chopped” after each round.

During the show, we get to meet and listen to the judges, and for the most part, I haven’t liked any of them. To me, their personalities have ranged from flat and uninteresting to downright grumpy.

Now, that didn’t stop me from watching the show. But I certainly wasn’t going to go out of my way to watch those judges anywhere else.

But that all changed when I saw several of those judges compete against each other on a different cooking show. Instead of being flat and grumpy, they were having fun and cracking jokes.

In other words, I saw their personality.

Now, when I see them on Chopped, I no longer see the dour judges I used to. My view of them now is more well-rounded, and I actually enjoying them.

I suspect you can all see where I’m going with all of this.

The more you share your personality in your marketing, the more people will feel they know you. And once they get to know you, they’re in position to like you—and we’d all rather do business with people we know, like, and trust.

In a nutshell:

So, what are the best ways to share your personality in your marketing?

In no particular order, here’s 5 ways to get started:

* Share stories from your life. From what’s going on with your kids and your pets to your latest vacations.

* Share your hopes and dreams. What do you really want in life? What are you currently working toward? What are you passionate about? There’s a good chance your ideal clients want to join you on your journey, but they can only join you if they know where you’re going.

* Share your rants. Is there something that really makes you angry? Or do you have a contradictory view on what’s considered standard in your industry? Share it. However, I would caution you to try and avoid sounding preachy or judgmental. It’s one thing to get all fired up about an issue, it’s quite another to turn it into a condescending sermon.

* Share your vulnerabilities. Talk about when you made a mistake or fell flat on your face. (But, important note—if you’re in the middle of a massive “black night of the soul,” it may be prudent to wait until you’re through it before you share it.)

* Develop your unique voice in your writing—the more people can feel you in your copy, the more compelling they’ll find your copy. (My second love-based business book “Love-Based Copywriting System” contains resources to help you cultivate your personality and your voice in your writing.)

If you’re uncomfortable sharing your personality in your marketing, my advice is to go slowly. Share something small, and see what happens. The more you do it, the easier it gets.

Want more copy tips? You may like my Love-Based Copywriting books (Volume 1 and Volume 2).

The 3 Biggest Myths Standing in Your Way of Being a Spiritual Entrepreneur with a Successful, Profitable Business, DEBUNKED

The 3 Biggest Myths Standing in Your Way of Being a Spiritual Entrepreneur with a Successful, Profitable Business, DEBUNKED

As a spiritual entrepreneur, does the idea of having a successful, profitable business make you feel vaguely uncomfortable?

(It’s okay—you don’t have to raise your hand or anything.)

I suspect a part of you absolutely wants a business that pays you well and helps you get your message or gifts out into the world.

But, does a part of you struggle with the idea of having a successful business? Do you think to yourself “I’m spiritual; I shouldn’t be concerned with practical things like money and business.”

If this is you, I want to begin by saying this: you’re not alone. A lot of spiritual entrepreneurs struggle with their businesses.

And, it’s my personal belief that a lot of that struggle and angst can be avoided.

Why?

Because many issues can be traced back to 3 fundamental myths about what it means to be a spiritual entrepreneur.

Just like artists and writers and other creative professionals, I feel spiritual entrepreneurs are plagued by their own history of failure and self doubt and getting in their own way.

What if having a successful, profitable business was as easy as a simple mindset shift? Would you be willing to give it a try and see what happens?

My personal belief is it really CAN be that easy—and to help, I’m busting what I consider the 3 biggest myths standing in your way of being a spiritual entrepreneur with a successful, profitable business.

Let’s get started.

Myth #1. As a spiritual entrepreneur, you’re not good at business.

This is obvious, right? You’re concerned with spiritual matters, not pragmatic things like running a business.

Besides, maybe you think business stuff is boring. Or difficult. Or you’re not good at. Or it’s “beneath” you in some way.

You just want to make the world a better place while enjoying time and money freedom—you don’t want to be mired down in spreadsheets and reports and that other icky stuff.

I, too, thought I wasn’t good at business. I thought it was boring, and I really didn’t want to have anything to do with it.

But, a funny thing happened: the more I pulled up my big girl panties and dug into learning business concepts, the more I realized I actually enjoyed running a business.

Business doesn’t have to be boring or difficult.

Isn’t that precisely the reason why we start a business in the first place?

What if you WERE good at business? What if it was fun and enjoyable to run a business? What would that look like for you?

Myth #2. As a spiritual entrepreneur, you’re not supposed to make money—you’re spiritual!

Money is such a low consideration, isn’t it? Only greedy, selfish people care about money. If you care about money, you can’t possibly be spiritual.

Or can you?

This is a huge one. In our culture, we’ve somehow separated making money and being spiritual, when there really is no reason to separate the two.

I believe money is a form of energy. It’s a way for people to give back to you and a way for you to receive payment for your offerings. It doesn’t have to be bad or evil or selfish or greedy.

Honestly, our relationship with money is just so tangled, there’s no way I can do it justice in this post (which is why I wrote an entire book on this—“Love-Based Money and Mindset,” as have devoted an entire podcast to transforming our relationship with money and our money stories) but I’d like to invite you to sit with this statement, and really feel into it:

There’s no virtue in being broke.

If you can’t help yourself, there’s no way you can help anyone else.

And, I know plenty of very spiritual entrepreneurs who are also financially successful. It doesn’t have to be either/or.

What if you could be both—financially and spiritually successful? What would that look like? How would your life and business shift?

Myth #3. As a spiritual entrepreneur, you’re supposed to suffer.

After all, our spiritual and religious leaders have suffered. Look at Jesus or Gandhi—they suffered. That means we should suffer, too. Right?

Well … first off, are we so sure they suffered? Sure they may have had a challenging life, but lots of us do. That doesn’t mean they suffered.

It’s my belief that a lot of suffering is a choice, and that choice takes place in our head. We suffer when we allow our fear-based emotions to run amok in our heads, and torture us unmercifully.

After all, there are very wealthy people who spend their days numbing out with booze and prescription pills, while women in Africa spend a big chunk of their lives carrying the water they need to survive on their heads—content and peaceful.

What gives?

Money alone isn’t a guarantee of happiness, just as a lack of money isn’t a guarantee of suffering. A lot of it boils down to your mindset, and what sort of relationship you have with your fear-based emotions.

And just like being broke isn’t virtuous and noble, neither is suffering. Suffering doesn’t make you more spiritual. It doesn’t even make you a better person. (I think we all know mean-spirited, nasty people who are definitely suffering, and making sure everyone around them suffers, too.)

Having a successful, profitable business and being proud of that business doesn’t make you a bad person. It doesn’t make you less spiritual.

It may allow you to help more people.

What if you didn’t have to suffer to be spiritual? What would open up for you? How would you approach your business if you knew that suffering was simply a choice, and you weren’t going to make that choice anymore?

If you’d like to dig into this more, my free book “How to Start a Business You Love AND that Loves You Back” is a great place start. The link to download is below.

Email Writing Tips for Effective Emails, Part 2

Email Writing Tips for Effective Emails, Part 2

Note: This is the second post in a two-post series, where I’m sharing my favorite email writing tips that convert prospects into buyers or leads into customers. For Part 1, go here.

By now, you know it’s important to use email to connect with your potential buyers on a personal, authentic level. When you do that effectively, your emails convert: readers take the actions you want them to take.

That’s why this series has focused on email writing tips to encourage people to open your emails, feel engaged with what you’ve written, read all the way through AND take some kind of action.

Now, let’s dive into the next three email writing tips that are designed to help you get your emails read from start to finish—or from subject line to PS!

Tip 4. Make Your Emails Personal.

The reason email works so well is that it is personal by nature. Your communication is like a letter to each of your community members. So when you’re writing an email, pretend you’re writing a letter to one specific person. When you master this, each of your ideal prospects will feel like you’ve written specifically to him or her. When they get the sense that you’ve taken the time and energy to focus on them and write something that matters to them, they’ll reward you by opening and reading your emails.

Tip 5. Write Great Subject Lines.

Think about it: when you’re looking at that long list of emails in your inbox, you’re filtering: deciding which ones you’ll trash immediately, which ones you’ll read later, and which ones you’ll read right away. How do you make those decisions? You look at the subject lines. So, what makes subject lines great, or effective?

  • Being specific. If you have a deadline coming up, or a webinar showing on a certain date, include that in your subject line.
  • Being a little “off-the-wall” or invoking curiosity. Some examples are, “Winter is coming,” or, “It worked … kind of.”
  • Mixing it up. If, in most cases, you write straightforward subject lines, try throwing in a few “off-the-wall” subject lines every few emails. Or, if you typically write mysterious subject lines, throw in a few straightforward subject lines here and there. This may help you cut through the email clutter.

Tip 6. Write Powerful PS’s.

Did you know that it’s extremely common for a reader to skip from the top of an email straight to the PS? In fact, the PS is known to be the second-most-commonly-read element in an email (behind the subject line). So this is “hot real estate” in your emails! There are several different ways to write a powerful PS — to get you started, I’ve included a few email writing tips below:

  • Address an objection. The most common objections people have when buying your product or service are time and money. They’re not sure whether they can afford the time or financial investment. So think about what you can say to overcome those objections.
  • Share one of your clients’ real-life success stories. Whether you summarize the story in your own words, or insert a quote from one of your clients, this is a powerful way to illustrate that you’re helping people get great results.
  • Position the reader’s choice about whether to invest with you as a choice to remain in their current situation, or to move forward and get the results you can provide them.
  • Recap a juicy benefit of the product or service you’re selling. For example, set it up as an “imagine” statement: “Imagine finally knowing exactly what to do when it comes to your marketing, rather than feeling overwhelmed and uncertain of what to do, when.”

In Conclusion …

I think the best part about writing effective emails is that it’s fun! It’s fun to be yourself, share with your community, and build relationships that thrive as your business does.

If this topic resonates with you, you may be interested in my book, “Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites.” It’s available here.

Tips for Writing an Effective Email, Part 1

Tips for Writing an Effective Email, Part 1

Note: This is the first post in a two-post series, where I’m sharing my favorite strategies for writing an effective email that convert prospects into buyers or leads into customers.

In today’s world—the world of building businesses online—most entrepreneurs understand that building an email list is extremely important.

An email list is one of the best ways to build your business because it gives you the opportunity to connect with potential buyers on a personal, authentic level.

But (you knew that was coming, right?) an effective email is only as effective as your open and click-through rates.

If nobody’s opening your emails, and nobody’s clicking on the links you put in them, then your email list is not actually working to build your business.

And that can be discouraging.

It takes lots of time, energy, mental power, and money to build a list and to write content regularly.

So today, I’m going to share three of my favorite tips for writing an effective email that converts (and I’ll share three more in my next post, so be sure to check back in a few days).

Tip 1. Make Sure Your Emails Are Mobile-Friendly.

I know. It sounds pretty obvious. Also, emails not being mobile-friendly doesn’t really sound like a deal-breaker, right? Wrong.

Here’s the thing: an increasing number of studies and statistics show that a growing number of people use phones and tablets to shop (not computers). In fact, one of the reports I read said that up to 70% of sales happen on phones or tablets.

If your emails look “off” or load improperly and aren’t easy to read, your readers are going to click “delete,” period.

So here are some mobile-friendly-related considerations to make as you create and compose your emails:

  • Whether to use a banner. Recently, I’ve noticed that entrepreneurs see better conversion rates when they do not use a banner.
  • The user experience: technically. People reading on teeny tiny mobile devices are more likely to skim than people who read on computers. Make it easy for people to consume your emails by incorporating white space, shorter paragraphs, and shorter sentences.
  • The user experience: emotionally. Be sure to think about how your subscribers feel when they get your email. They’re living, breathing, busy people, so give them something worthwhile.

Tip 2. Make Your Emails Easy-to-Read and Understand.

As I mentioned above, your ideal prospects are likely skimming your email. That being said, is it easy for them to follow what you’re saying? Are you using words they quickly and easily understand?

Are you making them think too hard?

Of course, I’m not saying you should “dumb down” your message. But you should also be sure to use language that your ideal prospects use (not jargon from your industry).

On another note, be crystal clear about which action you want your readers to take. Set links apart so readers know exactly where to click. If it’s not crystal clear, your readers likely won’t take action at all.

One of my favorite tips for creating a crystal clear call to action is to start with the end in mind. Before you even start writing the email, be clear in your own mind about which action you want readers to take—whether it’s to enroll in your new course, buy your book, or read your newest blog post.

Building your email that call to action is a great way to make sure you’ve just created an effective email. And don’t forget to keep it simple!

Tip 3. Connect with Your Ideal Prospects.

Your community is unique. It’s important to ensure you are connecting with the members of your community on a personal level.

Here are a couple of examples:

I’m on a list where the business owner writes very long emails a few times each week. To be honest, although I’m seeing better conversion rates with shorter emails, this entrepreneur’s emails are entertaining—a great mix of content and stories from his life.

And, they always include some kind of offer at the end.

I’d typically caution entrepreneurs against sending out too many sales emails, but this particular business owner has it nailed: I am certain he gets a lot of email opens and a lot of click-throughs because his emails are informative and entertaining!

One of my clients has had a great response from shorter, punchier emails that have a kind of “hook.” She’s often directing people to read her blog posts, and she makes her emails short and sweet and to the point. Although this effort is the opposite of the one I explained in the first example, it works!

It’s all about knowing what your ideal prospects want from you.

In Conclusion…

The next time you sit down to write an effective email, I’d encourage you to keep these tips in mind. When your emails are easy to read, when they are easy to understand, and when they resonate with the members of your community, you’ll see your conversion numbers improve.

And your business will grow as a result.

Check out Part 2 and the next 3 tips right here.

Meanwhile, if this topic resonates with you, you may be interested in my book, “Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites.” It’s available here.

Want More Clients? Here’s My Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist

Want More Clients? Here’s My Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist

Is there a secret “magical” button to getting clients?

I get this question a lot. And it makes sense — getting clients is the lifeblood for all businesses. But how do you do it?

Of course, there are a ton of answers. But because you’re here, I suspect you’re looking for proven ways to get new ideal clients in a love-based way … using methods that feel good to you and the people you’re hoping to attract.

That being said, let’s dive into my Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist:

• Know who your ideal clients are. 

Before you can attract your ideal client, you need to know who he or she is. And the best place to start is to get very clear on who your ideal client is (because your ideal client is different from your target market or niche).

• Know what is keeping your ideal clients up at night.

What, specifically, is bothering your ideal client? Does she want to make a big impact on this world? Is he searching for purpose? Is he tired of working double-full-time hours to make a part-time income? Is she exhausted from being in pain?

You must be able to dial in on their specific pain if you expect to be able to communicate how your product or service will help your ideal client.

• Know how your product or service solves this pain. 

How, exactly, does your product or service solve your ideal client’s main problem? For example, does it give her a process or system to reach the people she wants to serve? Does it give him clarity about his purpose? Does it offer a method for boosting his income while working fewer hours? Is it a new solution to help her get out of pain?

• Properly communicate how your product or service will solve your ideal client’s problems. 

Touch on pain, but don’t twist the knife.

Many heart-centered or spiritual entrepreneurs shy away from using pain in their marketing copy because it makes them feel “icky” or arm-twisty. But I’m a big proponent of using pain—respectfully—because it’s a great way to show your ideal prospects that you understand what they’re going through and that you can help them.

Of course, you don’t want to use fear-based emotions like shame or guilt when you’re mentioning their pain, and don’t use your copy to agitate their pain to the level of suffering!

Use your ideal clients’ language, not your own.

Don’t try to be cutesy when it comes to writing your copy. Instead, use the very same words and phrases your ideal clients would use. If you’re not sure what those words and phrases are, ask your ideal clients. Survey them, or ask them on your social networking channels or Internet groups.

Know where your ideal clients hang out, online and offline—and then hang out there, too. 

The first step to knowing where your ideal clients hang out is to get to know them on a really deep level. Once you know, you need to ramp up your presence in those places … even if they aren’t your favorite places (because you are not necessarily your own ideal client). If your ideal clients don’t have the chance to get to know you, by hanging out with you, then you’re going to have a tough time convincing them to work with you.

Connect with your ideal clients when you meet them—without trying to “sell” them.

When you meet your ideal clients, connect with them on a personal level. You may share your expertise or answer questions. Or, you may discuss your favorite books or TV shows, or your pets or hobbies. You may discuss your family life, your favorite city to visit, or your favorite foods. Letting people in on who you are is a huge element of the know, like, trust factor.

• Be accessible and visible, consistently.

It’s simple math: the more you’re “out and about,” whether it’s virtually or at networking events, the more opportunities you create to connect with your ideal clients. So whether you are going to networking events, hanging out online, or whatever you choose to do, be consistent about it.

• Follow up with the people who raised their hands and said they were interested in getting to know you or work with you.

Lack of follow-up is like leaving money on the table. Keep in mind that in today’s society, we’re all receiving countless messages every day. The volume is so great that many people don’t even hear these messages! So follow-up is key—again, it provides you with more opportunities to ensure your ideal prospects remember you, and remember why they were interested in the first place.

The more you get yourself out there, the more you share your voice, your personality, and your expertise, the higher the chances that you’ll land in front of your ideal prospects and ideal clients!

So, that’s the Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist — use it anytime you want to jumpstart getting clients in the door.

If this topic resonated with you, you may be interested in “Love-Based Copywriting Method: The Philosophy Behind Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites.” It’s available at most online retailers. Learn more, here.

 

How to Craft a Compelling Message That Gets You Results

How to Craft a Compelling Message That Gets You Results

When it comes to marketing, do you ever feel invisible? As if no one is paying the slightest attention to your message?

You’re spending all of this time writing marketing copy, emails, social media posts, blog posts, and website posts and they’re falling on deaf ears?

No matter how hard you work, how much blood, sweat, and tears go into your writing, your ideal prospects just aren’t buying.

If this sounds familiar, you’re in luck. Today, I’m sharing my advice for crafting a compelling message that converts your ideal prospects into ideal clients.

Your ideal clients see you and hear you and know you. And to know you is to love you, right?

Right.

So let’s get started.

A compelling message comprises two important elements: your ideal clients and your offer.

You’ll find your compelling message where those two elements intersect.

Ideal Clients

I’m a big believer in the power of identifying an ideal client as opposed to a target market or niche.

Whereas target markets and niches are based on external factors/demographics, ideal clients are based on internal factors like desires and fears.

Here’s my favorite illustration of this distinction:

A target market might be stay-at-home moms. A niche within that target market could be stay-at-home moms looking for a work-from-home opportunity.

And within that niche lies an ideal client.

For example, one stay-at-home mom may be looking for a work-from-home opportunity because she needs to contribute financially to her household. Her family needs two incomes to pay the bills.

Another stay-at-home mom may be looking for a work-from-home opportunity because she wants something of her own; she wants to use her professional skills, and she wants to develop an identity separate from that of a mother or wife.

Take a moment to think about the difference between the mindsets of those two women. Two completely different ideas are keeping them up at night.

In the first example, the mom is worried about paying the bills. And in the second, she wants to develop a new aspect of her identity.

So when it comes to messaging, your message to each of these women would be completely different.

People respond to specifics. So it’s important that your message address the specific worries or fears of your ideal client. The more specific you are in describing their unique situation, the more they’ll feel like you’re speaking directly to them; that you understand them. And the more they feel like you understand them, the more they’ll believe your offer will help them.

Now, if you aren’t sure what’s keeping your ideal client up at night, ask! Send out a survey or hang out where they hang out—Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.—and be a great listener.

Your Offer

Once you understand specifically what’s keeping your ideal client up at night, you can craft your offer so it’s clear you will solve his or her specific problem.

The best way to illustrate this is with an example.

One of my longtime clients, The Coaches Console, provides coaches with an all-inclusive software that streamlines and automates all the back-end elements of a coaching business: marketing, lead generation, client conversion, client enrollment and agreement, client support, scheduling, client notes … everything!

So what keeps their ideal clients up at night? They want to make a difference in the world. They’re passionate about coaching. But they find the business side of coaching overwhelming.

So The Coaches Console’s offer is their software—which solves their ideal client’s problem by taking all the guesswork and overwhelm out of the business side of coaching so that their ideal clients can focus on what they love best: coaching.

The Intersection: Your Compelling Message

So now you know what keeps your ideal client up at night. And you know what your offer is, and how you position it as a solution to what keeps your ideal client up at night.

It’s time to create your compelling message.

Let’s look at the three ideal client examples I’ve addressed in this post:

Stay-at-home moms who need to make money. These women are up at night because they need an income. So if you’re offering them a business opportunity, your compelling message would be: “I provide stay-at-home moms an opportunity to make a reliable income while still having time to take care of their families.”

Stay-at-home moms who want an identity separate from wife and/or mom. These women are up at night because they want to do something of their own. So if you’re offering them a business opportunity, your compelling message would be: “I provide stay-at-home moms an opportunity to have fun as entrepreneurs while still being there for their family members.”

Coaches who love coaching but are overwhelmed by the business details. These coaches are up at night because they want to focus on coaching and want to run a profitable business—but don’t necessarily have the business acumen to do so. So if you’re offering them a software to take care of all those business details, your compelling message would be: “We give coaches the tools they need to streamline and automate their businesses so they can focus on coaching.”

Your message, which happens at the intersection of Your Ideal Client and Your Offer, will be compelling once you make it clear that you will solve your ideal client’s specific problem.

If you are ready to start writing your compelling message, spend some time getting to know your ideal client and what keeps her up at night. Spend some time crafting your offer as the unique solution to that problem. And that, my friends, is where your compelling message is born.

If this topic resonated with you, you may be interested in Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process To Master Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites. It’s available at most online retailers. Learn more, here.

 

 

[Video] Flip It! Where is the Magic Website Traffic Bullet?

[Video] Flip It! Where is the Magic Website Traffic Bullet?

How many of you are secretly looking for the website traffic button?

I mean, all you have to do is take a quick view of your Facebook feed to see tons of ads from gurus promising to teach you where that that magic website traffic bullet is.

It’s Facebook ads!

No, it’s Instagram!

Pinterest is the missing secret.

Maybe you should post videos or do a podcast.

No, go back to good old fashioned SEO.

Ahhhh! Overwhelm alert!

So, chances are you’re either running around like a nut trying to do EVERY website traffic strategy under the sun or you do nothing because you have no idea where to turn or which one would be the best one.

You probably already know what I’m going to say, which is there is no secret magic website traffic bullet. Not even if you buy it.

So, what’s the answer? Just give up? Resign yourself to not getting enough traffic to your site or blog?

Not at all. In fact, I’m going to share two very powerful strategies for creating your own magic traffic bullet.

  • Whatever strategy or strategies you pick to attract visitors to your website or blog, decide right now you’re in it for the long term. In other words, this isn’t a “do it for a month and expect you’re going to get thousands of visitors and be set for life. That’s just not the case. It can take weeks or even months before you build enough momentum to start getting some traction, and once you’re got it started, you’re going to have to maintain it. So, having a plan in place to make sure you are consistently using that strategy is key.
  • Whatever strategy you do, always put out your very best work. This also includes if you post regular blog posts or videos or a podcast. If you’re writing blogs, then don’t just race through it and slap something up. Take the time to do the best job you can on everything you create. While this isn’t necessarily the fastest way to attract visitors to your site, I guarantee this is the key to standing out. If you put out really good content, your people WILL find you.

I share more in the video — check it out:

 

(And if you’re wondering exactly how you can get everything you want simply by flipping your perspective? Check out the first episode here.)

If you liked this episode, you may also like my “Love-Based Online Marketing” book — you can check it out here.

[Video] Flip It! Should I Offer a Guarantee on My Products or Services?

[Video] Flip It! Should I Offer a Guarantee on My Products or Services?

I hear this question a lot, and what I’ve found most entrepreneurs are REALLY asking is: What if I offer a guarantee and people take advantage of me? They buy my product, go through it all, and then ask for their money back?

So, let me start by saying I get it. And, your fears aren’t necessarily unfounded. There ARE people out there who do take advantage of money-back guarantees.

However, I’ve been doing this a long time and I can confidently tell you that is a very, very small percentage of your potential buyers. The vast majority of your buyers are good, decent, honest people who have no desire to take advantage of you.

It also might help if you understand the purpose of a guarantee. Guarantees are actually designed to take the risk off of the buyer and put it back on the seller.

Put yourself in the shoes of the buyer. You’re searching online for a solution to your problem, and you come across a product that looks perfect. BUT, all you have to judge is what you see on a sales page. This isn’t Costco where you can pick the product up and look at it in the store. You’re purchasing something sight unseen.

Which means YOU are taking all the risk. Not the seller.

What happens if it’s not as promised? Or what if you get absolutely nothing?

Then what? Sure you can go through your credit card to try and get the charges reversed, but now you’re wasting your time to get your money back and there’s no guarantee that’s going to work either.

As the seller, if you offer a guarantee, you are assuming some of the risk. And, as you are going to financially profiting from the transaction, it makes sense that you do assume some of the risk.

Plus, studies have found if you actually sell more if you offer a guarantee. Watch and I explain why:

 

(And if you’re wondering exactly how you can get everything you want simply by flipping your perspective? Check out the first episode here.)

If you liked this episode, you may also like my “Love-Based Online Marketing” book — you can check it out here.

[Revamped] Why Isn’t My Website Making Me Any Money?

[Revamped] Why Isn’t My Website Making Me Any Money?

Ever since 2014, when God/Universe downloaded the entire love-based copy philosophy into me, I’ve realized that one of my missions in life is to spread the word that you have a choice.

You don’t have to use traditional, fear-based methods to promote and grow your business — you CAN choose love instead.

But, I also realized I needed to do more than simply educate people on the love-based philosophy. I also need to help entrepreneurs, such as yourself, take specific action steps so they actually can build and run their business successfully from a place of love. (Because, quite honestly, if you aren’t making money selling with love, then there’s a problem we need to fix.)

Which brings me to this post — to help you take those action steps, I’ve been working behind the scenes on a few projects, including revamping one of my bestselling products “Why Isn’t My Website Making Me Any Money? 10 Easy Steps To Create a Website You Love AND that Loves You Back.”

Check it out!

If you’re not happy with your website on any level, this little product can help you pinpoint the problem and get you back on track … and do it from a place of love.

It includes brand new bonuses (such as my “6 Steps to Crafting a Hot Freebie Perfect for Your Ideal Clients So You Build Your List AND Sell Your Products/Programs/Services”) AND a brand new Website Checklist, to make it even easier to help you get to the bottom of what’s off with your website.

Check it out and see if it’s what you need to move your business forward.

Your Elevator Pitch: 4 Mistakes You May Be Making, and How to Turn Them Around

Your Elevator Pitch: 4 Mistakes You May Be Making, and How to Turn Them Around

The elevator pitch. It’s one of the most important marketing tools for entrepreneurs. It also is the one that strikes fear into their hearts.

Why is it at once important and scary?

Well, because it’s a great way to explain what you do in a concise, intriguing way that could ultimately generate some business!

That is, when it’s done right. The good news is that you CAN do it right, with just a little bit of coaching. The great news is that I’m going to give you that coaching right here, right now.

I’m going to share four mistakes I see most often, as well as tips for turning those mistakes around.

Mistake 1: Your elevator pitch is all about you. You mention your credentials or education, or the name of your proven system for change.

How to Turn It Around: Your elevator pitch should focus on your ideal client. Period. For more on how to do this effectively, keep reading!

Mistake 2: Your elevator pitch misses the point. So many elevator pitches focus on a specific system or offering, and they end up missing their mark. So what is the point? The point is that YOU understand a specific problem your ideal client is facing, and that YOU are equipped to help him solve it.

How to Turn It Around: Your elevator pitch should touch on one or two items that are keeping your ideal client awake at night: a specific problem that YOU (and only you) can solve. You can mention the pain your ideal client is experiencing, or the transformation he can expect to experience, or a combination of the two.

Mistake 3: You try to make your elevator pitch creative. Of course, it should have energy while describing the transformation you provide, and for whom. But don’t try to be cutesy!

How to Turn It Around: Keep your elevator short and to-the-point, and be sure that it explains what you do—clearly!

Mistake 4: When your first elevator pitch isn’t effective, you give up rather than testing different versions to see which one does work.

How to Turn It Around: Test, test, test! The only way to really know what works is to let the market tell you. Practice your elevator pitch on your ideal prospects and see how they respond. Test and adjust until you get the response you want.

Finally, I know examples can provide a great foundation for creating your own elevator pitches, so here are some examples you can learn from:

Example 1:

“I am a business coach and a mom who has been in business for six years.”

Notice: This elevator pitch is all about the person speaking. Let’s shift it around so it instead focuses on mompreneurs and what keeps them up at night—life balance—and the potential transformation. It’s short and simple, and doesn’t try to be cutesy.

“I coach mompreneurs on how to easily balance being a mom with being an entrepreneur and feel great doing it.”

Example 2:

“My powerful system, SHIFT IT, gives people guidance to make big changes in their lives.”

Notice: You have no idea what this person does, do you? Is he a coach or a consultant or a shaman? This elevator pitch is not specific, and it focuses on the person talking, rather than the ideal client. Let’s turn it around by making it more specific, and positioning the speaker as the solution to the problems experienced by a specific group of people.

“I coach professionals in making the mental shift necessary to overcome their fear of the unknown and start their dream businesses.

Example 3:

“I guide seekers in living better by building better businesses.”

Notice: This elevator pitch tries to hard to be cutesy and clever. Let’s shift it so that it focuses on spiritual entrepreneurs and their concern about their businesses conflicting with their values. Again, we want to be clear—not clever.

“I coach busy spiritual entrepreneurs on how to build profitable businesses without sacrificing their core values.”

Example 4:

“I am a business coach with five years’ experience and a special certification in exercise as healing.”

Notice: We can’t tell, based on this elevator pitch, who this person works with or how she can help them. Let’s shift it around so that it’s more about the ideal client and the transformation he can expect to experience—the solution to one of his problems.

“I coach entrepreneurs in the health industry on how to incorporate health into their own lives so they can practice what they preach, enjoy business ownership, and earn great money doing what they love.”

Lots of entrepreneurs struggle with crafting effective elevator pitches, but I’m confident that when you follow the guidelines in this article, you’ll find that it’s not as scary or intimidating as you thought it was.

If this topic resonated with you, you may be interested in “Love-Based Copywriting Method: The Philosophy Behind Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites.” It’s available at most online retailers. Learn more, here.