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Category: Love-Based Selling

A New, Love-Based Approach to the Product Launch: 5 Reasons Why Launching a Product Can Be a BIG Win, Even If You Don’t Make Many Sales

A New, Love-Based Approach to the Product Launch: 5 Reasons Why Launching a Product Can Be a BIG Win, Even If You Don’t Make Many Sales

The product launch: it’s a great way for a conscious, mission-driven spiritual entrepreneur to build both the buzz and her biz, when done right. But did you know that a product launch can also pay off in other ways too?

In other words, a “successful” product launch can mean many positive things for your business, AND for you, that have nothing to do with the number of sales you make during the launch.

Most entrepreneurs focus on money when they’re planning a product launch. They’re thinking about how many sales they’ll make. They’re seeing dollar signs, sales funnels, and expansion.

And yes, those are wonderful reasons to do a product launch.

However, that intense focus on product launch sales can also cause a tremendous amount of stress. I’ve helped guide hundreds of launches, and in the vast majority of cases, I’ve also taken on the role as “launch therapist.” (Yes, even the big “gurus” are not immune to launch pressure — in fact, I would argue in some cases they feel even more pressure: because they are so big and visible, word definitely gets out if they flop.)

Along with all the usual nasty health issues that we’ve come to expect when we’re under stress (lack of sleep, getting sick, headaches, etc.), what’s not talked about is how we also can slip into fear-based marketing if we’re not careful.

Even the most well-intentioned entrepreneur can find herself or himself using fear-based marketing tactics when an important launch suddenly goes sideways. It’s completely understandable and normal.

The problem is, if you are an entrepreneur who typically uses love to market yourself, slipping into fear can cause confusion in the marketplace. This can lead to your launch (and other marketing efforts) being less effective.

That’s why today I’d like to invite you to consider another perspective — how to view the product launch through a love-based lens.

Not only is this a great way to shift your mindset, but it can also help you take some of the pressure off. And yes, it’s very possible to have a super-successful product launch without a bunch of sales.

Check out these five non-sales, love-based reasons to do a product launch:

  1. You get out in front of your ideal clients: the people who really need you. It’s all about visibility. Even a small product launch can build buzz, and get people talking about you. This can build name and brand recognition, which is key – not only to growing a business, but also to letting your ideal clients know you’re out there, ready to help them solve their problems.
  2. Your ideal clients see you as an expert (because you are!). When you release free content during a product launch, you’re able to allow people to experience how knowledgeable you are. You’re giving them a taste of the transformation you can provide, and they’ll begin viewing you as an expert.
  3. You attract more of your ideal clients, which means you can share your message with a greater number of people. Offering free content is an awesome way to build your list. A growing, responsive list is key to building your business, and it’s also critical to building the relationships that allow you to share your gifts!
  4. You build momentum. Product launches take an enormous amount of energy to get off the ground. The laws of physics say that energy is neither created nor destroyed – it’s just transformed. So when you build momentum in creating and launching your product, that energy transforms into momentum for your business. So even post-launch, your prospects are still “talking” about you and are more open to receiving your message.
  5. You’re able to create a bigger impact than ever. The increased visibility and credibility from your launch also increases their interest in YOU. So even if they weren’t interested in the specific product you were launching, they may be interested in other products and services you offer. This means you’re able to help a greater number of people in a greater number of ways – making a bigger impact than ever before.

Here’s where this gets even better …

You’ll be reaching tons of people, spreading your message, and sharing your gift.  With this love-based mindset, you’ll be able to relax, enjoy your product launch, and view “success” in a whole new light – one that doesn’t focus on just the money.

If this resonates with you, you may like to take the teachings deeper with my book, “Love-Based Online Marketing: Campaigns to Grow a Business You Love AND That Loves You Back.” It’s available here.

The Bullet Point: The Holy Grail of Copywriting

The Bullet Point: The Holy Grail of Copywriting

If there is one element of direct response copywriting that has the potential to get people to click that “Buy Now” button, it’s the mighty bullet point.

A well-written bullet point, or set of bullet points, has the potential to close the deal faster than almost any other element in your marketing copy.

Why?

Well, because a bullet point is a tool that is quick to read, mentions the pain your ideal client is in, and your solution, all in one neat and tidy package.

Now, let’s talk about the “how” – how do you write a rockin’, take-no-prisoners bullet point?


So you probably know the difference between features and benefits, but just in case: a feature is an attribute of your product or service. A benefit is the “what’s in it for me” of that attribute.

Here’s the key: people buy benefits.

If you buy a book on copywriting, it’s not because you simply want to add to your book collection. So even though you’re buying a book, you’re not actually buying the book. Right? What you’re actually purchasing is the knowledge you will gain from reading the book, which will strengthen your copywriting skills … which will lead to more sales.

Therefore, when it comes to copywriting, it’s important to spend more time describing benefits than features.

The bullet point is the perfect place to make those benefits shine.

Now, before we take a deep dive into bullet points, let’s get really clear on the difference between features and benefits.

Features are the “what you get.” They’re the deliverables.

So let’s take the example above: a book about copywriting. The book itself is a feature. It’s what you get.

If you’re selling a car, the features may include a leather interior, a big engine, and a stereo.

If you’re selling an online program, the features may include weekly video trainings, a downloadable workbook, recordings of every session, and access to a private online forum.

A benefit, on the other hand, is the answer to the “What’s in it for me?” question. (Or, in your case, “what’s in it for the reader or potential buyer.”)

So going back to the car example, the benefit of leather interior is that it resists stains. A big engine means you get where you’re going, fast. And a nice stereo system means you can listen to awesome tunes as a soundtrack to your life.

As I mentioned above, the benefit of buying a book about copywriting is new knowledge that leads to more sales.

If you’re selling that coaching program, think about the benefits of each feature I listed:

  • Weekly video trainings provide information and accountability, so the client stays on track and receives support in implementing what he’s learning.
  • A downloadable workbook allows the client to personalize the new information so he can actually use it to create positive change.
  • Recordings of every session mean the client can access this new information any time, whether it’s relevant now or in the future.
  • The private online forum gives the client a sense of community, as well as access to support, advice and feedback, so he can get his questions answered and continue moving forward.

For every feature you list, you must also list a benefit. I like to find the benefit by asking, “So what?”

Let’s revisit that copywriting book example. The feature is a book. Sixty pages of information. So what? So that you can improve your writing skills and make more sales.

So, let’s get back to the bullet point.

Each bullet point should include a single benefit, and should either move your prospect toward pleasure or away from pain (I recommend a 70/30 ratio of toward pleasure to away from pain bullets).

If right now you’re cringing, because you’re thinking “But Michele! I’m conscious/mission driven/heart-centered! I don’t want to mention my prospects’ pain!” keep reading.

It is actually a disservice to your potential clients to ignore their pain. When you lightly touch on it, you can remind them that they have a choice about whether to remain in pain, or move away from it. (If you want to learn more about how to do this the love-based way, you can check out last week’s article, here. And if you want to learn more about the love-based copy philosophy, go here.)

Below are some examples of benefit-driven bullet points, from my “Why Isn’t My Website Making Me Any Money” sales letter. The benefits are in bold.

* An easy and effective way to transform yourself into an expert (so people will be more likely to buy from you)

[Increasing the likelihood that people will buy is moving the prospect toward pleasure.]

* 7 simple, 5-minute tweaks that add credibility to your site, so people will be more comfortable handing over their credit card and other personal information

[Making people more comfortable handing over information moves the prospect toward pleasure.]

* The one sentence you MUST add to your site if you want anyone to purchase anything from you

[People purchasing moves the prospect toward pleasure.]

* A common, VERY costly mistake you’ve probably made (or are considering making), which leads to your website not making sales (and how to avoid it)

[Making mistakes is painful! So this bullet point shows a feature that moves prospects away from pain.]

Once you’ve mastered the art of the bullet point, you’ll find that your copywriting is more effective, and you’re better able to make your biggest impact.

If this topic resonates with you, you may be interested in the second book in my Love-Based Copywriting series, “Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires, and Invites,” where I take this information on writing powerful bullet points even deeper. Get the book here to discover a new approach to direct response copywriting that feels good to you and to your prospects!

A New Perspective on Direct Response Copywriting: How to Sell More with Love

A New Perspective on Direct Response Copywriting: How to Sell More with Love

You’ve undoubtedly heard that direct response copywriting is, hands-down, the best way to make more sales online.

But …

If you’re among the conscious/mission-driven entrepreneurs of the world, then the thought of using direct response copy in your business may make you feel “icky.”

(Not sure what direct response copywriting is? Direct response copy is any copy designed to get readers to take action — such as a click on a link or purchase a product. You may have seen it in those long sales letters where you scroll down forever looking for the price, or emails you receive when you’re on someone’s email list.)

All the “gurus” say you need direct response copywriting if you want to build your online business.

But when you sit down to write it, you feel inauthentic. Arm-twisty. Sales-y. Like you need to take a shower.

Sound familiar?

Have you ever stopped to think about why you feel that way when it comes to sales?

It’s because a lot of traditional direct response copy is based on tapping into fear-based emotions, like fear, guilt, scarcity, and shame.

You see, the only way you can compel someone to take action is to tap into his or her emotions. It doesn’t matter if you’re making an offer to a potential client or trying to get your kids to go to bed at a reasonable hour. It all comes down to emotions.

And, all emotions fall under either fear or love — so you have a choice if you want to use fear to persuade or love. (You can learn more about the love-based copy and marketing philosophy here.)

If you’re here, I have a feeling you don’t want to use fear, guilt, scarcity, and shame to sell your products and services.

And the good news is that you don’t have to!

You’re probably wondering how.

To create effective marketing copy based in love rather than fear, you must understand the truth about pain.

Wait, what?

You read that right; pain IS part of the love-based copy writing approach.

I’ll explain.

Conscious entrepreneurs are often sensitive to talking about prospective clients’ pain. You’re in business to alleviate pain, right? So the last thing you want to do is remind your clients about the very thing you want to heal.

While I agree—you don’t want to twist that knife—I want you to understand that talking about pain is actually an important part of the healing (and buying) process.

Here are some considerations to make:

Pain Versus Suffering

Pain is real — there is a problem in people’s lives and they have pain around it.

Not only that, but pain is a necessary part of life. It’s an indicator that something is going wrong.

Suffering is a whole different animal.

Suffering typically happens when we magnify existing pain using fear, shame, guilt or something else.

Pain is a part of life. Suffering doesn’t have to be.

So when it comes to copywriting, it’s actually critical to remind people of their pain and then offer them a solution—and give them the opportunity to make a choice about whether to use that solution.

If they’re done experiencing the pain, they may be ready for your product or services. If not, they’re probably not an ideal client yet.

On the other hand, it’s unnecessary (and can feel slimy!) to twist the knife and use your copywriting to cause suffering. Yes, a lot of traditional direct response copywriting has roots in twisting the knife (which is also known as agitating the pain). And that’s one of the reasons why using pain in marketing and copy has gotten such a bad rap .

It’s a fine line, but a crucial one.

The Importance of Pain

Like I mentioned above, pain is an indicator that something is wrong, or that something could be better.

As a business owner, pain you experience may indicate an opportunity for growth.

So take this as an opportunity to get comfortable with pain. Consider the following:

* Pain adds urgency. You would never call your dentist in the middle of the night and say “Oh my God, I missed my cleaning, can you get me in now?” But if you broke a tooth? Or a jaw? Yeah you may be waking your dentist (or doctor) up.

So, let’s bring that back to marketing:

If you don’t remind your ideal clients about their pain, they may say things like, “Oh, what you do sounds great! I’ll definitely have to work with you one day.” But as you know, in so many cases “one day” never comes.

And that pain doesn’t go away. In fact, it may even devolve into suffering because they don’t take you up on working together, which may alleviate the pain.

* People remain in the status quo … unless something compels them to change. Unless you actually remind someone that she’s in pain, she’ll be likely to resist making a change. Only by reminding her are you giving her the opportunity to CHOOSE change. Does they really want to stay there? Or is she ready to move forward?

* I believe the sales process should mirror the transformation your products or services create. If you are a transformative teacher, healer, or coach, you already know transformation includes pain. If you don’t give prospects the gift of going through their pain in your marketing or selling process, they may decide in the middle of working with you—when they do experience pain—that they’re not ready to move forward … and that’s when people disappear, drop out, or even ask for refunds (and none of us want those things to happen).

* Neglecting to talk about pain is neglecting the opportunity to allow your clients to put two and two together: that your offering may actually be a solution to their pain. In today’s busy world, people may not go so far as to draw the connection between their pain and your offering, if you don’t make it perfectly clear. (Plus, it’s also disrespectful. Your ideal clients are truly in pain — not addressing it can feel disrespectful.)

* As soon as you master love-based copywriting – using pain in your marketing materials – it feels so good! You can stand in your power as a confident successful entrepreneur because your copy will attract the people who most need the work you do. You’ll be attracting and landing clients whose lives you can transform. Not only will you grow your business but you’ll also make a bigger impact.

* Learning how to use pain in a love-based way gives YOU the opportunity to grow and heal.

This could be exactly what you need to do to take your business to the next level. Getting uncomfortable is part of being an entrepreneur. That’s why I’m challenging you today to try using pain in a love-based marketing way to stretch yourself, personally and professionally.

You can use this article as an example of how to use pain in a love-based way. Did you notice how I wove in pain without twisting the knife? I educated you on pain without causing suffering.

Now it’s time for you to decide: Do you want to keep doing what you’ve always done, writing marketing copy that feels icky? Or are you ready to change how your market to your ideal clients?

Bottom line: it’s really a disservice to your ideal prospects NOT mention their pain.  Because if you don’t, they’re not going to buy. And if they don’t buy, you won’t make the difference you long to make, your ideal clients will remain stuck in their pain, and you may never become the person and entrepreneur you’re meant to become.

What I’ve covered here is truly just the tip of the iceberg. If you’re interested in learning more, definitely check out my best-selling book “Love-Based Copywriting – The Philosophy Behind Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites Your Ideal Prospects to Become Ideal Clients.”

What’s the Difference Between Being Love-Based and Fear-Based?

What’s the Difference Between Being Love-Based and Fear-Based?

It’s fear vs love. Believe it or not, the opposite of love isn’t hate. It’s fear. All emotions basically fall under one of two categories — love-based emotions of fear-based. love-based-copy-4a

Love-based emotions includes love, hope, joy, gratitude, peace, faith, trust, confidence, happiness, connection, forgiveness, openness, passion, freedom, harmony, honesty, beauty, compassion, self-love, self-appreciation, respect, acceptance, understanding, etc.

Fear-based emotions include fear, anger, grief, shame, guilt, bitterness, judgment, jealously, frustration, doubt, insecurity, etc.

A lot of what we consider traditional business is built on a foundation of fear vs love (actually a lot of traditional things are built on fear). The reason this happens is because in a lot of ways, fear is easier. Many, many folks live their lives being controlled in some way by fear-based emotions.

Either consciously — they’re angry, depressed, grieving, judgmental, fearful, worrying, unhappy, etc., or unconsciously — they feel an uncomfortable emotion, they run away from it, bury it, hide from it, etc. (Think about all the things that happen when someone gets upset — they start a fight, take a drink, overeat, go shopping, gossip, etc.) So, if fear-based emotions are controlling your behavior, it’s going to be very difficult to build anything love-based.

Now, just to be clear, love-based doesn’t mean you don’t feel fear-based emotions — on the contrary, people who have embraced love-based businesses and lives in fact DO fully feel all emotions, whether love-based or fear-based.

And there is definitely a place for fear-based emotions in our human existence, so rather than fight them, the key is to really feel them, and let them move through you. (Feelings just want to be felt after all.)

And, because folks who have embraced the love-based way do feel fear-based emotions, it also means they aren’t controlled by them. It’s when you try not to feel the fear-based emotions are when they control you.

Now, when you are selling, or attempting to persuade someone to do something, this really comes into play, because in order to persuade anyone to do anything — it doesn’t matter what it is (get your kids to go to bed at their bedtime, convince someone to go on a date with you, sell someone your product or service) — you absolutely need to tap into their emotions. Hence, you end up tapping into fear vs love.

Traditional direct response copy taps into fear-based emotions (which include fear/worry, shame, guilt, anger), which is why it feels so icky. But you don’t have to tap into fear-based emotions to sell — you CAN sell with love, by tapping into love-based emotions.

If you’d like to learn more about how you can sell with love rather than fear, I’d like to invite you to check out my love-based business books, especially my two “Love-Based Copywriting” books. You can learn more right here.