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The Mighty Bullet Point: How to Write Love-Based Bullet Points That Inspire Your Ideal Clients to Take Action

The Mighty Bullet Point: How to Write Love-Based Bullet Points That Inspire Your Ideal Clients to Take Action

I’m going to start by making a bold statement about the mighty bullet point:

In addition to being benefit-rich, as I mentioned in The Bullet Point: The Holy Grail of Copywriting, if you want to inspire your ideal client to buy, your bullet point should come from a place of love, rather than fear.

As you know, it’s my mission to give heart-centered and conscious entrepreneurs the information they need to build their businesses in a love-based way. In fact, I wrote a whole series of books on doing just that (check out the Love-Based Copywriting books here).

It only stands to reason, then, that I believe every piece of your marketing copy should be love-based … including your bullet points.

There are two places in your copy where this is especially applicable:

  • Introductory bullet points, where you let your readers know whether they’re in the right place by touching on their pain and emotions.
  • “What-you-learn” bullet points, where you highlight specific teaching points in a benefit-rich way.

Let’s talk about each one in depth.

The Introductory Bullet Point.

Its job description: to acknowledge that you understand your ideal client’s pain, what’s keeping her up at night.

What to include: descriptions of the “outer” and “inner” problems; for example, an outer problem may be that your ideal client has spent thousands of dollars putting up a website only to find it doesn’t generate sales (outer problem), and therefore, she’s frustrated (inner problem).

How to write it in a love-based way: mention the pain, but don’t twist the knife!

What to watch out for: using the pain to make your ideal client feel worse.

Here are some examples of effective love-based introductory bullet points:

  • You spent countless resources—time, money, and energy—to write, format, launch, and market your new book, but it’s just not selling, and you’re starting to feel discouraged.
  • This whole “content marketing” strategy seems so mysterious, and with all the information out there, you’re not sure what works and what doesn’t. It’s overwhelming, isn’t it?

Do you see how each of these bullet points contains an outer problem and the resulting inner problem?

Here are some examples of those same introductory bullet points written in a fear-based or ineffective way (caution: I do not recommend using these as models!):

  • You spent countless resources—time, money, and energy—to write, format, launch, and market your new book, but it’s just not selling. Now you’re starting to think your writing is terrible, you’ll never make it as an author, and you’ll be forced to choose between working odd jobs or starving your children.
  • This whole “content marketing” strategy seems so mysterious, which is why so many people fail at it—and therefore, fail at business, too.

Do you see how each of these examples paints a pretty scary picture of the future for whoever is reading it?

The What-You-Learn Bullet Point.

Its job description: to give your ideal client a taste of what she will learn, and how that will benefit her: how her life will change as a result of taking action on the offer you’re presenting.

What to include: a specific-yet-mysterious description of a concrete teaching point, and how that teaching point will contribute to a transformation; for example, you may mention, “The most important marketing strategy you’ll ever use (this is a teaching point, and it’s mysterious because you don’t reveal what the strategy is), and how it will have ideal clients knocking on your door” (clients knocking on the door is the potential transformation).

How to write it in a love-based way: present the benefit in terms of a solution, so you’re providing hope.

What to watch out for: lack of specificity and giving away the “whole enchilada.”

Here are some examples of effective love-based what-you-learn bullet points:

  • The Number One reason many entrepreneurs feel overwhelmed when they first launch their businesses, and what to do about it, so you can enjoy running your company while still reaching your goals quickly.
  • Three mistakes you may be making as a startup coach, and how to avoid them, so you can finally attract your ideal clients and make the money and the impact about which you’re so passionate.

Do you see how these bullet points mention a specific teaching point, but don’t give away exactly what the reader will learn? Also, notice that they offer a positive solution, giving the reader hope.

Here are some examples of those same what-you-learn bullet points written in a fear-based or ineffective way (caution: I do not recommend using these as models!):

  • Why your inability to prioritize leaves you overwhelmed and burned out, and why, if you don’t change it, you’ll never enjoy running your company.
  • Three mistakes you’re making as a startup coach, and why, if you don’t nip them in the bud, you’ll never get clients, or make an impact or a good living.

Do you see how the first of these bullet points tells readers that that “Number One” reason is, and how both bullet points paint a scary picture of the reader’s future if he doesn’t learn the teaching points?

When you nail the writing of the bullet point, you’ll dramatically improve the results you get with your copywriting and marketing efforts!

If this topic resonated with you, you may want to grab your own copy of Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites (Volume 2 in the Love-Based Business Series).”

The Bullet Point: The Holy Grail of Copywriting

The Bullet Point: The Holy Grail of Copywriting

If there is one element of direct response copywriting that has the potential to get people to click that “Buy Now” button, it’s the mighty bullet point.

A well-written bullet point, or set of bullet points, has the potential to close the deal faster than almost any other element in your marketing copy.

Why?

Well, because a bullet point is a tool that is quick to read, mentions the pain your ideal client is in, and your solution, all in one neat and tidy package.

Now, let’s talk about the “how” – how do you write a rockin’, take-no-prisoners bullet point?


So you probably know the difference between features and benefits, but just in case: a feature is an attribute of your product or service. A benefit is the “what’s in it for me” of that attribute.

Here’s the key: people buy benefits.

If you buy a book on copywriting, it’s not because you simply want to add to your book collection. So even though you’re buying a book, you’re not actually buying the book. Right? What you’re actually purchasing is the knowledge you will gain from reading the book, which will strengthen your copywriting skills … which will lead to more sales.

Therefore, when it comes to copywriting, it’s important to spend more time describing benefits than features.

The bullet point is the perfect place to make those benefits shine.

Now, before we take a deep dive into bullet points, let’s get really clear on the difference between features and benefits.

Features are the “what you get.” They’re the deliverables.

So let’s take the example above: a book about copywriting. The book itself is a feature. It’s what you get.

If you’re selling a car, the features may include a leather interior, a big engine, and a stereo.

If you’re selling an online program, the features may include weekly video trainings, a downloadable workbook, recordings of every session, and access to a private online forum.

A benefit, on the other hand, is the answer to the “What’s in it for me?” question. (Or, in your case, “what’s in it for the reader or potential buyer.”)

So going back to the car example, the benefit of leather interior is that it resists stains. A big engine means you get where you’re going, fast. And a nice stereo system means you can listen to awesome tunes as a soundtrack to your life.

As I mentioned above, the benefit of buying a book about copywriting is new knowledge that leads to more sales.

If you’re selling that coaching program, think about the benefits of each feature I listed:

  • Weekly video trainings provide information and accountability, so the client stays on track and receives support in implementing what he’s learning.
  • A downloadable workbook allows the client to personalize the new information so he can actually use it to create positive change.
  • Recordings of every session mean the client can access this new information any time, whether it’s relevant now or in the future.
  • The private online forum gives the client a sense of community, as well as access to support, advice and feedback, so he can get his questions answered and continue moving forward.

For every feature you list, you must also list a benefit. I like to find the benefit by asking, “So what?”

Let’s revisit that copywriting book example. The feature is a book. Sixty pages of information. So what? So that you can improve your writing skills and make more sales.

So, let’s get back to the bullet point.

Each bullet point should include a single benefit, and should either move your prospect toward pleasure or away from pain (I recommend a 70/30 ratio of toward pleasure to away from pain bullets).

If right now you’re cringing, because you’re thinking “But Michele! I’m conscious/mission driven/heart-centered! I don’t want to mention my prospects’ pain!” keep reading.

It is actually a disservice to your potential clients to ignore their pain. When you lightly touch on it, you can remind them that they have a choice about whether to remain in pain, or move away from it. (If you want to learn more about how to do this the love-based way, you can check out last week’s article, here. And if you want to learn more about the love-based copy philosophy, go here.)

Below are some examples of benefit-driven bullet points, from my “Why Isn’t My Website Making Me Any Money” sales letter. The benefits are in bold.

* An easy and effective way to transform yourself into an expert (so people will be more likely to buy from you)

[Increasing the likelihood that people will buy is moving the prospect toward pleasure.]

* 7 simple, 5-minute tweaks that add credibility to your site, so people will be more comfortable handing over their credit card and other personal information

[Making people more comfortable handing over information moves the prospect toward pleasure.]

* The one sentence you MUST add to your site if you want anyone to purchase anything from you

[People purchasing moves the prospect toward pleasure.]

* A common, VERY costly mistake you’ve probably made (or are considering making), which leads to your website not making sales (and how to avoid it)

[Making mistakes is painful! So this bullet point shows a feature that moves prospects away from pain.]

Once you’ve mastered the art of the bullet point, you’ll find that your copywriting is more effective, and you’re better able to make your biggest impact.

If this topic resonates with you, you may be interested in the second book in my Love-Based Copywriting series, “Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires, and Invites,” where I take this information on writing powerful bullet points even deeper. Get the book here to discover a new approach to direct response copywriting that feels good to you and to your prospects!