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Want More Clients? Here’s My Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist

Want More Clients? Here’s My Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist

Is there a secret “magical” button to getting clients?

I get this question a lot. And it makes sense — getting clients is the lifeblood for all businesses. But how do you do it?

Of course, there are a ton of answers. But because you’re here, I suspect you’re looking for proven ways to get new ideal clients in a love-based way … using methods that feel good to you and the people you’re hoping to attract.

That being said, let’s dive into my Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist:

• Know who your ideal clients are. 

Before you can attract your ideal client, you need to know who he or she is. And the best place to start is to get very clear on who your ideal client is (because your ideal client is different from your target market or niche).

• Know what is keeping your ideal clients up at night.

What, specifically, is bothering your ideal client? Does she want to make a big impact on this world? Is he searching for purpose? Is he tired of working double-full-time hours to make a part-time income? Is she exhausted from being in pain?

You must be able to dial in on their specific pain if you expect to be able to communicate how your product or service will help your ideal client.

• Know how your product or service solves this pain. 

How, exactly, does your product or service solve your ideal client’s main problem? For example, does it give her a process or system to reach the people she wants to serve? Does it give him clarity about his purpose? Does it offer a method for boosting his income while working fewer hours? Is it a new solution to help her get out of pain?

• Properly communicate how your product or service will solve your ideal client’s problems. 

Touch on pain, but don’t twist the knife.

Many heart-centered or spiritual entrepreneurs shy away from using pain in their marketing copy because it makes them feel “icky” or arm-twisty. But I’m a big proponent of using pain—respectfully—because it’s a great way to show your ideal prospects that you understand what they’re going through and that you can help them.

Of course, you don’t want to use fear-based emotions like shame or guilt when you’re mentioning their pain, and don’t use your copy to agitate their pain to the level of suffering!

Use your ideal clients’ language, not your own.

Don’t try to be cutesy when it comes to writing your copy. Instead, use the very same words and phrases your ideal clients would use. If you’re not sure what those words and phrases are, ask your ideal clients. Survey them, or ask them on your social networking channels or Internet groups.

Know where your ideal clients hang out, online and offline—and then hang out there, too. 

The first step to knowing where your ideal clients hang out is to get to know them on a really deep level. Once you know, you need to ramp up your presence in those places … even if they aren’t your favorite places (because you are not necessarily your own ideal client). If your ideal clients don’t have the chance to get to know you, by hanging out with you, then you’re going to have a tough time convincing them to work with you.

Connect with your ideal clients when you meet them—without trying to “sell” them.

When you meet your ideal clients, connect with them on a personal level. You may share your expertise or answer questions. Or, you may discuss your favorite books or TV shows, or your pets or hobbies. You may discuss your family life, your favorite city to visit, or your favorite foods. Letting people in on who you are is a huge element of the know, like, trust factor.

• Be accessible and visible, consistently.

It’s simple math: the more you’re “out and about,” whether it’s virtually or at networking events, the more opportunities you create to connect with your ideal clients. So whether you are going to networking events, hanging out online, or whatever you choose to do, be consistent about it.

• Follow up with the people who raised their hands and said they were interested in getting to know you or work with you.

Lack of follow-up is like leaving money on the table. Keep in mind that in today’s society, we’re all receiving countless messages every day. The volume is so great that many people don’t even hear these messages! So follow-up is key—again, it provides you with more opportunities to ensure your ideal prospects remember you, and remember why they were interested in the first place.

The more you get yourself out there, the more you share your voice, your personality, and your expertise, the higher the chances that you’ll land in front of your ideal prospects and ideal clients!

So, that’s the Love-Based Getting Clients Checklist — use it anytime you want to jumpstart getting clients in the door.

If this topic resonated with you, you may be interested in “Love-Based Copywriting Method: The Philosophy Behind Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites.” It’s available at most online retailers. Learn more, here.

 

How to Craft a Compelling Message That Gets You Results

How to Craft a Compelling Message That Gets You Results

When it comes to marketing, do you ever feel invisible? As if no one is paying the slightest attention to your message?

You’re spending all of this time writing marketing copy, emails, social media posts, blog posts, and website posts and they’re falling on deaf ears?

No matter how hard you work, how much blood, sweat, and tears go into your writing, your ideal prospects just aren’t buying.

If this sounds familiar, you’re in luck. Today, I’m sharing my advice for crafting a compelling message that converts your ideal prospects into ideal clients.

Your ideal clients see you and hear you and know you. And to know you is to love you, right?

Right.

So let’s get started.

A compelling message comprises two important elements: your ideal clients and your offer.

You’ll find your compelling message where those two elements intersect.

Ideal Clients

I’m a big believer in the power of identifying an ideal client as opposed to a target market or niche.

Whereas target markets and niches are based on external factors/demographics, ideal clients are based on internal factors like desires and fears.

Here’s my favorite illustration of this distinction:

A target market might be stay-at-home moms. A niche within that target market could be stay-at-home moms looking for a work-from-home opportunity.

And within that niche lies an ideal client.

For example, one stay-at-home mom may be looking for a work-from-home opportunity because she needs to contribute financially to her household. Her family needs two incomes to pay the bills.

Another stay-at-home mom may be looking for a work-from-home opportunity because she wants something of her own; she wants to use her professional skills, and she wants to develop an identity separate from that of a mother or wife.

Take a moment to think about the difference between the mindsets of those two women. Two completely different ideas are keeping them up at night.

In the first example, the mom is worried about paying the bills. And in the second, she wants to develop a new aspect of her identity.

So when it comes to messaging, your message to each of these women would be completely different.

People respond to specifics. So it’s important that your message address the specific worries or fears of your ideal client. The more specific you are in describing their unique situation, the more they’ll feel like you’re speaking directly to them; that you understand them. And the more they feel like you understand them, the more they’ll believe your offer will help them.

Now, if you aren’t sure what’s keeping your ideal client up at night, ask! Send out a survey or hang out where they hang out—Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.—and be a great listener.

Your Offer

Once you understand specifically what’s keeping your ideal client up at night, you can craft your offer so it’s clear you will solve his or her specific problem.

The best way to illustrate this is with an example.

One of my longtime clients, The Coaches Console, provides coaches with an all-inclusive software that streamlines and automates all the back-end elements of a coaching business: marketing, lead generation, client conversion, client enrollment and agreement, client support, scheduling, client notes … everything!

So what keeps their ideal clients up at night? They want to make a difference in the world. They’re passionate about coaching. But they find the business side of coaching overwhelming.

So The Coaches Console’s offer is their software—which solves their ideal client’s problem by taking all the guesswork and overwhelm out of the business side of coaching so that their ideal clients can focus on what they love best: coaching.

The Intersection: Your Compelling Message

So now you know what keeps your ideal client up at night. And you know what your offer is, and how you position it as a solution to what keeps your ideal client up at night.

It’s time to create your compelling message.

Let’s look at the three ideal client examples I’ve addressed in this post:

Stay-at-home moms who need to make money. These women are up at night because they need an income. So if you’re offering them a business opportunity, your compelling message would be: “I provide stay-at-home moms an opportunity to make a reliable income while still having time to take care of their families.”

Stay-at-home moms who want an identity separate from wife and/or mom. These women are up at night because they want to do something of their own. So if you’re offering them a business opportunity, your compelling message would be: “I provide stay-at-home moms an opportunity to have fun as entrepreneurs while still being there for their family members.”

Coaches who love coaching but are overwhelmed by the business details. These coaches are up at night because they want to focus on coaching and want to run a profitable business—but don’t necessarily have the business acumen to do so. So if you’re offering them a software to take care of all those business details, your compelling message would be: “We give coaches the tools they need to streamline and automate their businesses so they can focus on coaching.”

Your message, which happens at the intersection of Your Ideal Client and Your Offer, will be compelling once you make it clear that you will solve your ideal client’s specific problem.

If you are ready to start writing your compelling message, spend some time getting to know your ideal client and what keeps her up at night. Spend some time crafting your offer as the unique solution to that problem. And that, my friends, is where your compelling message is born.

If this topic resonated with you, you may be interested in Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process To Master Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites. It’s available at most online retailers. Learn more, here.