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The Future of Copywriting: 5 Copywriting Trends to Watch For

The Future of Copywriting: 5 Copywriting Trends to Watch For

I’m back with my crystal ball (aka angel snow globe) with a few predictions on copywriting trends to watch for in the wacky world of copywriting over the coming year.

But, before I dig into those copywriting trends, let’s define what copywriting is.

Copywriting is writing promotional materials for businesses, nothing to do with protecting intellectual property or putting a copyright on something (notice the difference in spelling).

My specialty is a subset called “direct response copywriting,” which entails crafting copy that your ideal prospects directly respond to. For example, when you write an email asking your community to click on a link, you’re writing direct response copy. Those long sales letters you’re scrolling down forever, all-the-while asking yourself, “How much does this actually cost?” and wondering if anyone actually ever reads those things anyway … yep. That’s direct response.

(And by the way, the short answer is yes—people read them.)

The Internet is littered with direct response copy, mainly because it’s a fabulous way to leverage yourself and your marketing efforts, especially when you’re using the Internet to market yourself. Direct response copy does the selling for you, so you can market and sell yourself one to many.

But, as much good as it does, people still hate it. That’s partially because traditional direct response copy uses a lot of fear-based triggers (which doesn’t feel very good). It’s also because a lot of people just hate writing, and would rather not do it at all. (It’s okay if this is you, we’re all friends here.)

Needless to say, there’s a lot of misinformation around the future of copy, so I thought I’d take a moment to sort out the facts from the fiction—and what better way to do that than by talking about five copywriting trends I see happening now?

Without further ado, let’s dig into those copywriting trends.

Trend 1. Copywriting isn’t going away (and yes, that includes writing email copy). Yep, I hear those proclamations too: “Email is dead. Facebook is the place to be. No, maybe it’s videos. Or podcasts. Or …”

So, first off, nothing beats building your own sandbox versus playing in other people’s sandboxes. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be using Facebook and Youtube—you absolutely should have a presence on any platform your ideal prospects are on.

You just shouldn’t build your entire business on them.

An excellent way to market and build your business is to spend time in the places your ideal clients are hanging out, with the intent to inspire them to join you in your sandbox.

Ideally you’d love for them to join your email list, so you have permission to reach out when the timing is right for you. But, even if they regularly visit your blog or have subscribed to your podcast, that’s a step in the right direction, too.

And, for any of that to happen, it’s important to have harnessed the power of copy in your marketing. No, that doesn’t mean YOU need to do all the writing yourself—hiring it out is perfectly acceptable. But, you need to come to terms with the fact that as long as you own a business, you’re going to be generating copy (and likely a lot of it).

And that leads us to the second of the five copywriting trends.

Trend 2. Connecting with your ideal clients is key to future success. There was a time in the not-so-distant past when you could generate an awful lot of money simply by harnessing the power of “new” in your marketing.

That time has come and gone (and frankly, I don’t think it’s a bad thing, as I would argue very few entrepreneurs who had mastered the power of “new” actually had a solid, sustainable business.)

So, if you can’t use “new” to attract customers, clients and buyers, what can you do?

Easy. Focus on connecting and building relationships with your prospects. (And, if you are looking to attract more ideal clients to your business, connecting and building relationships is hands down the best strategy to use).

Copy is one of the best ways to connect and build relationships, especially when you use it in an email. (Emails are one-to-one medium: people are getting emails in their inbox, so by it’s very nature, it’s a personal connection. It’s just a matter of you remembering that, when you craft emails to your subscribers.)

But, this is just the first step to building more rapport with your ideal prospects.

Trend 3. Focus on giving your prospects exactly what they want. And I guarantee what they want is plenty of content, and maybe even to be entertained.

What they DON’T want? To be sold to constantly.

That’s why so many entrepreneurs have email lists that are, for all practical purposes, dead. They’ve sold to them so much that their prospects have stopped interacting with them.

(Note: Constantly sending your subscribers to other people’s “free” launch content, such as free books or videos or webinars, constitutes selling. Yes, yes, I know the content is usually pretty solid. But, it’s still designed to sell a program, likely a high-ticket item, and anyone who says “yes” to that free content WILL get inundated with emails for a few weeks. Your subscribers know this, and are tuning it out. I’m not saying not to promote other people’s launches or to stop doing your own; I absolutely still believe product launches are an important tool in your marketing toolbox. However, what I AM saying is to count those emails toward your “total sales emails” quota. You only have so many sales emails you can send to your list before they stop paying attention, so choose wisely.)

Your subscribers don’t mind some sales emails, but it’s important to balance those sales emails with what they’re really looking for, which is most likely content and entertainment.

But, there’s an even bigger prediction on the horizon (a.k.a. the fourth of five copywriting trends)…

Trend 4. Segmenting is the future. While this is a more advanced tactic, having a way to segment your subscribers and allow THEM to decide what sort of content and communication they want from you is going to become more and more important.

I’ve seen stats showing far better results when emails are tailored to your subscribers based on their answers to a few questions you ask them.

So, how do you do this? Some email programs, such as Infusion Soft (although there are cheaper email software programs that are coming out now that are offering these options) allow you to “tag” your subscribers depending on if they click a link, or how they answer a question. You can then send an email to just the people who were tagged.

For instance, maybe you send out an email asking, “If you’re brand new to business, click here,” you can then “tag” everyone who clicks on that link. Now you have a segmented list of new entrepreneurs, and you can send them content and offers that are tailored specifically to them.

See how powerful that can be?

It’s always been the case that the more you can speak directly to your ideal prospects concerns and what’s keeping them up at night, the more they’ll buy from you. Until the Internet, it was far more complicated to give them tailored offers.

Of course, this is a bit of a catch-22. Now that it is easier, it’s likely your ideal prospects will be expecting it more. Which means if you’re NOT segmenting, you could be losing potential clients, customers and buyers.

But, there’s still one last of the 5 copywriting trends that will also be important when it comes to writing copy.

Trend 5. Use passion, vulnerability, and stories in your copy. Remember, people want to do business with people. And, you connecting and building relationships with your ideal prospects is going to be even more important now, as it truly is one of the top trends in marketing and business.

One key way to connect with them using copy is to do things like tap into your passion, and show your personality. Reveal your vulnerabilities and share stories in your copy.

As humans, we’re wired to respond to stories. So, the more we can use stories in our marketing, the more our ideal prospects will pay attention to us. And, if they’re paying attention, they’re far more likely to become buyers, customers, and clients.

I know it can feel strange to use stories and share your vulnerabilities (business IS supposed to be professional after all, and if you came from corporate, it can feel even more alien), but sharing something you’re vulnerable about can go a long way in making you far more relatable.

And, now, for a last, bonus prediction (because 6 copywriting trends didn’t sound nearly as sexy as five).

Bonus Trend 6. Fear-based copy that focuses on shaming and scarcity is on its way out, and love-based copy is the new black. So, as the founder of the love-based copy philosophy and the love-based business movement, I get that this might seem more than a little self-serving.

It’s also not completely true.

Yet.

While fear-based copy and marketing DOES still work, it’s definitely not working as well as it used to. I do believe it’s on its way out, and selling and marketing yourself with love is on its way in, but we’re not quite there yet.

As a species, we still psychologically respond to fear-based triggers. The more we do the inner work and shift to building our businesses and living our lives on a foundation of love, the less fear-based triggers will work.

And, if you want to dig into love-based copy at an even deeper level, you may want to check out my books: Love-Based Copywriting Method: The Philosophy Behind Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites and Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites.

 

[Video] Flip It! That Long Copy Sales Letter Doesn’t Actually Work, Does It?

[Video] Flip It! That Long Copy Sales Letter Doesn’t Actually Work, Does It?

First off, what exactly is a long copy sales letter? Those are those web site pages where you scroll down and down for like forever trying to find the price and asking yourself “who reads these things anyway?”

Yeah. Those are the ones.

The short answer is yes, those long copy sales letter do in fact, make sales, even if you personally find them annoying.

And there are a few reasons why they work.

First, people need information to make a decision on whether or not they’re going to purchase something. A sales letter gives them that information. They need to get clear on what it is they’re buying and if it will, in fact, solve the issue that’s keeping them up at night.

The only way they’re going to know that is through words, and sometimes a lot of them.

Imagine yourself on a sales call. Let’s say it takes you 30 minutes to have a conversation and make a sale. If you were to transcribe that conversation, it would probably be around 10-12 pages or so, depending on how fast you both talked.

So, now let’s imagine yourself on a different sales call. Maybe you cover some of the same things you covered in the first call but you’re also answering different questions. If you create a transcript from the new information, maybe that’s adding another 6 pages. So, now you’re up to 16-18 pages.

Now you’re on a third call and you are answering still other questions.

I think you see where I’m going with this.

A sales letter is actually an effective way to answer all the different questions all your different prospects have about your products and services. It’s actually quite efficient when you consider most sales pages are less than one transcribed sales call.

This is also why the more expensive your product or program is, the longer your sales page typically becomes — because the more expensive something is, the more questions you have.

And, make no mistake, people need to have their questions answered before they’ll make the purchase. A confused mind doesn’t buy, nor does a mind that has a lot of questions.

In addition, the more time your prospects spend reading your content, listening to your podcasts, watching your videos or reviewing your marketing materials, the more likely they’ll end up investing with you. That has to do with the know, like and trust factor — the more they get to know you, the more they’ll start to like and trust you. And people want to do business with people they know like or trust.

If you’re still uncomfortable with the idea of the long copy sales letter, watch below for some tips on flipping your perspective:

(Wondering exactly how you can get everything you want simply by flipping your perspective? Check out the first episode here.)

If you liked this episode, you may also like my Love-Based Copy books: Love-Based Copywriting Method and Love-Based Copywriting System, both available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, iTunes and other online retailers.

The Mighty Bullet Point: How to Write Love-Based Bullet Points That Inspire Your Ideal Clients to Take Action

The Mighty Bullet Point: How to Write Love-Based Bullet Points That Inspire Your Ideal Clients to Take Action

I’m going to start by making a bold statement about the mighty bullet point:

In addition to being benefit-rich, as I mentioned in The Bullet Point: The Holy Grail of Copywriting, if you want to inspire your ideal client to buy, your bullet point should come from a place of love, rather than fear.

As you know, it’s my mission to give heart-centered and conscious entrepreneurs the information they need to build their businesses in a love-based way. In fact, I wrote a whole series of books on doing just that (check out the Love-Based Copywriting books here).

It only stands to reason, then, that I believe every piece of your marketing copy should be love-based … including your bullet points.

There are two places in your copy where this is especially applicable:

  • Introductory bullet points, where you let your readers know whether they’re in the right place by touching on their pain and emotions.
  • “What-you-learn” bullet points, where you highlight specific teaching points in a benefit-rich way.

Let’s talk about each one in depth.

The Introductory Bullet Point.

Its job description: to acknowledge that you understand your ideal client’s pain, what’s keeping her up at night.

What to include: descriptions of the “outer” and “inner” problems; for example, an outer problem may be that your ideal client has spent thousands of dollars putting up a website only to find it doesn’t generate sales (outer problem), and therefore, she’s frustrated (inner problem).

How to write it in a love-based way: mention the pain, but don’t twist the knife!

What to watch out for: using the pain to make your ideal client feel worse.

Here are some examples of effective love-based introductory bullet points:

  • You spent countless resources—time, money, and energy—to write, format, launch, and market your new book, but it’s just not selling, and you’re starting to feel discouraged.
  • This whole “content marketing” strategy seems so mysterious, and with all the information out there, you’re not sure what works and what doesn’t. It’s overwhelming, isn’t it?

Do you see how each of these bullet points contains an outer problem and the resulting inner problem?

Here are some examples of those same introductory bullet points written in a fear-based or ineffective way (caution: I do not recommend using these as models!):

  • You spent countless resources—time, money, and energy—to write, format, launch, and market your new book, but it’s just not selling. Now you’re starting to think your writing is terrible, you’ll never make it as an author, and you’ll be forced to choose between working odd jobs or starving your children.
  • This whole “content marketing” strategy seems so mysterious, which is why so many people fail at it—and therefore, fail at business, too.

Do you see how each of these examples paints a pretty scary picture of the future for whoever is reading it?

The What-You-Learn Bullet Point.

Its job description: to give your ideal client a taste of what she will learn, and how that will benefit her: how her life will change as a result of taking action on the offer you’re presenting.

What to include: a specific-yet-mysterious description of a concrete teaching point, and how that teaching point will contribute to a transformation; for example, you may mention, “The most important marketing strategy you’ll ever use (this is a teaching point, and it’s mysterious because you don’t reveal what the strategy is), and how it will have ideal clients knocking on your door” (clients knocking on the door is the potential transformation).

How to write it in a love-based way: present the benefit in terms of a solution, so you’re providing hope.

What to watch out for: lack of specificity and giving away the “whole enchilada.”

Here are some examples of effective love-based what-you-learn bullet points:

  • The Number One reason many entrepreneurs feel overwhelmed when they first launch their businesses, and what to do about it, so you can enjoy running your company while still reaching your goals quickly.
  • Three mistakes you may be making as a startup coach, and how to avoid them, so you can finally attract your ideal clients and make the money and the impact about which you’re so passionate.

Do you see how these bullet points mention a specific teaching point, but don’t give away exactly what the reader will learn? Also, notice that they offer a positive solution, giving the reader hope.

Here are some examples of those same what-you-learn bullet points written in a fear-based or ineffective way (caution: I do not recommend using these as models!):

  • Why your inability to prioritize leaves you overwhelmed and burned out, and why, if you don’t change it, you’ll never enjoy running your company.
  • Three mistakes you’re making as a startup coach, and why, if you don’t nip them in the bud, you’ll never get clients, or make an impact or a good living.

Do you see how the first of these bullet points tells readers that that “Number One” reason is, and how both bullet points paint a scary picture of the reader’s future if he doesn’t learn the teaching points?

When you nail the writing of the bullet point, you’ll dramatically improve the results you get with your copywriting and marketing efforts!

If this topic resonated with you, you may want to grab your own copy of Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites (Volume 2 in the Love-Based Business Series).”

[Video] The Story Behind the Story — “Love-Based Copywriting Method”

[Video] The Story Behind the Story — “Love-Based Copywriting Method”

“Love-Based Copywriting Method” is the book that started the Love-Based Business movement.

Before I wrote this book, entrepreneurs didn’t have much of a choice on how they wanted to market themselves with their promotional copy (copywriting is writing marketing materials, nothing to do with putting a copyright on something or protecting intellectual property).

They could either choose to use traditional direct response copy and marketing (an example of direct response copy is those long sales letters that you scroll down forever wondering how much it is and does anyone actually read these or those emails asking you to click on a link) which meant in many cases they were using marketing tactics that felt hype-y, sales-y or inauthentic.

Or, they could choose not use direct response copy and marketing.

Of course, the problem with NOT using it is then you haven’t leveraged your marketing. When you use direct response copy, you are marketing one-to-many. Without it, you’re stuck marketing one-to-one. As you can imagine, it’s tough to grow your business that way.

But, then, in 2014, my friend Susan Liddy came out with a book called “Love-Based Marketing.” I looked at that title and thought “Love-Based Copy.” What’s the opposite of love-based copy? Well, it would be fear-based copy.

And that’s when the whole philosophy downloaded into me.

But, I’m getting a little ahead of myself — check out the whole story behind the story of “Love-Based Copywriting Method” below:

If you’re looking for a way to sell more with love, this book is the place to start. It explains the philosophy behind love-based copy so you can build your marketing and business on a solid foundation of love.

“Love-Based Copywriting Method” is available at all the major online retailers — check it out here.

5 Steps to Writing Effective Headlines in a Love-Based Way

5 Steps to Writing Effective Headlines in a Love-Based Way

Today, I’m devoting an entire blog post to writing headlines. Maybe right now you’re wondering, “WHY, Michele? What’s the big deal around headlines? Are they really that important?”

Honestly? Yes.

First off, if you’ve ever dealt with any kind of marketing copy—written it yourself, or hired someone else to write it for you—you’ve probably wondered whether it’s really going to work: whether it will convince people to buy from you.

The answer again is “yes.” It DOES work.

So how do you master any of it, so you can get the results you want?

It all starts with writing a great headline.

When it comes to sales pages and website copy, the headline is the first thing people read.

And guess what?

The headline is probably the single most important group of words in any piece of marketing copy.

Why?

The point of the headline is to inspire your ideal clients to read the first sentence of your copy (which should inspire them to read the next sentence, and so on).

So how do you make sure that it does its job?

Take a moment to consider what inspires you to keep reading, whether it’s a book, a magazine, or a piece of marketing copy like an email, a website, or a sales page.

In many cases, it boils down to curiosity.

Think about the books people call “page-turners.” These books almost always incorporate some sort of mystery or unknown, and a skilled author will bring in a piece of it at the beginning, and reveal more pieces throughout—never closing off that mystery until the last chapter.

A great magazine article usually hints at a story of someone making a change or transition, or overcoming an obstacle, and you keep reading to learn how they did it.

Which, of course, brings us to marketing copy.

Skilled copywriters bring out their readers’ curiosity from the very first opportunity—whether it’s the subject line of an email, or the headline of a sales page or website.

HOW do they do it?

The following 5 tips for writing effective headlines will help you inspire your ideal clients to keep reading.

Tip 1. Talk about a Solution.

One of the easiest ways to generate curiosity in your ideal clients is to talk about the solution to whatever’s keeping them up at night.

So if you haven’t already, take some time to think about your ideal client and what his or her biggest pain point or problem is. (Go here to learn the important difference between target market, niche market, and ideal client.)

The best way to illustrate this is to use an example.

Let’s say you’re a life coach, and your gift is helping ideal clients get past their money-related blocks so they can finally begin receiving abundance. Your headline may read:

Finally: Live Your Life Free from Fear, and Open Yourself to Receiving the Abundance You Deserve

Your ideal clients suffer from the pain of being stuck in their fear-based feelings around money and scarcity—it’s probably keeping them up at night. Here, you’re offering them the solution they very likely seek.

Tip 2.  Add Details.

Adding relevant details to your headline can make it even more enticing. For example, you may choose to add a time-frame in which people can expect to experience the solution you’re offering. Add a guarantee, or address potential objections.

For example:

Give Me Seven Days and I’ll Show You How to FINALLY Break Free from the Scarcity Cycle, and Live a Life Full of Abundance

Finally: Break FREE from the Scarcity Cycle, for Good … Guaranteed

Finally: Break FREE from the Scarcity Cycle, for Good (Even If You’ve Tried Everything Else and Nothing Has Worked)

See how those details “dial up” the curiosity factor?

Tip 3. Change up the Format.

Headlines can take on many different formats, from a standard headline like I’ve shown you above, to a “story” format to a “how to” or “if/then” format.

Here are some more examples:

How a Struggling Entrepreneur Who Thought He’d Lost Everything Turned His Financial Situation Around, for Good

How to Ditch Your Fear, for Good, So You Can Finally Live in Abundance

If You Can Watch This Video, Then You Can Move Past Your Fear and Achieve Abundance

Tip 4. Use the Trifecta—Prehead, Headline, Subhead.

I go into this trifecta in more depth in my book, Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites.

In short, the prehead lets people know they’re in the right place, the headline presents a solution, and the subhead adds details.

Tip 5. Come from a Place of Love.

People are being sold to all the time. Think about how many emails land in your inbox each day. Think about how many advertisements you see, how many pieces of sales copy you read in a given time period when you’re on your computer.

They’re in your Facebook feed, your Instagram feed, your radio station.

It’s SO easy for people to tune out something the read, or to quickly skip onto the next message.

That’s why everything you write should sound genuine – should come from a place of love.

Whenever you sit down to write copy, pretend that you’re writing a letter or note to a friend – someone very important to you. Write from the heart.

I know, because you’re here, on this site, that you care about the people you work with. Make sure that shines through in your copy, and especially in your headline.

Yes, it should sound/feel exciting. But it also has to sound authentic, so your readers know you truly care about the results they get.

When you master the art of writing headlines, your ideal clients will make the choice to read the copy below them.

If this resonates with you, you may enjoy reading the second book in my Love-Based Copywriting series, Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites. It’s available in most eBook formats, and you can get it here.

The Bullet Point: The Holy Grail of Copywriting

The Bullet Point: The Holy Grail of Copywriting

If there is one element of direct response copywriting that has the potential to get people to click that “Buy Now” button, it’s the mighty bullet point.

A well-written bullet point, or set of bullet points, has the potential to close the deal faster than almost any other element in your marketing copy.

Why?

Well, because a bullet point is a tool that is quick to read, mentions the pain your ideal client is in, and your solution, all in one neat and tidy package.

Now, let’s talk about the “how” – how do you write a rockin’, take-no-prisoners bullet point?


So you probably know the difference between features and benefits, but just in case: a feature is an attribute of your product or service. A benefit is the “what’s in it for me” of that attribute.

Here’s the key: people buy benefits.

If you buy a book on copywriting, it’s not because you simply want to add to your book collection. So even though you’re buying a book, you’re not actually buying the book. Right? What you’re actually purchasing is the knowledge you will gain from reading the book, which will strengthen your copywriting skills … which will lead to more sales.

Therefore, when it comes to copywriting, it’s important to spend more time describing benefits than features.

The bullet point is the perfect place to make those benefits shine.

Now, before we take a deep dive into bullet points, let’s get really clear on the difference between features and benefits.

Features are the “what you get.” They’re the deliverables.

So let’s take the example above: a book about copywriting. The book itself is a feature. It’s what you get.

If you’re selling a car, the features may include a leather interior, a big engine, and a stereo.

If you’re selling an online program, the features may include weekly video trainings, a downloadable workbook, recordings of every session, and access to a private online forum.

A benefit, on the other hand, is the answer to the “What’s in it for me?” question. (Or, in your case, “what’s in it for the reader or potential buyer.”)

So going back to the car example, the benefit of leather interior is that it resists stains. A big engine means you get where you’re going, fast. And a nice stereo system means you can listen to awesome tunes as a soundtrack to your life.

As I mentioned above, the benefit of buying a book about copywriting is new knowledge that leads to more sales.

If you’re selling that coaching program, think about the benefits of each feature I listed:

  • Weekly video trainings provide information and accountability, so the client stays on track and receives support in implementing what he’s learning.
  • A downloadable workbook allows the client to personalize the new information so he can actually use it to create positive change.
  • Recordings of every session mean the client can access this new information any time, whether it’s relevant now or in the future.
  • The private online forum gives the client a sense of community, as well as access to support, advice and feedback, so he can get his questions answered and continue moving forward.

For every feature you list, you must also list a benefit. I like to find the benefit by asking, “So what?”

Let’s revisit that copywriting book example. The feature is a book. Sixty pages of information. So what? So that you can improve your writing skills and make more sales.

So, let’s get back to the bullet point.

Each bullet point should include a single benefit, and should either move your prospect toward pleasure or away from pain (I recommend a 70/30 ratio of toward pleasure to away from pain bullets).

If right now you’re cringing, because you’re thinking “But Michele! I’m conscious/mission driven/heart-centered! I don’t want to mention my prospects’ pain!” keep reading.

It is actually a disservice to your potential clients to ignore their pain. When you lightly touch on it, you can remind them that they have a choice about whether to remain in pain, or move away from it. (If you want to learn more about how to do this the love-based way, you can check out last week’s article, here. And if you want to learn more about the love-based copy philosophy, go here.)

Below are some examples of benefit-driven bullet points, from my “Why Isn’t My Website Making Me Any Money” sales letter. The benefits are in bold.

* An easy and effective way to transform yourself into an expert (so people will be more likely to buy from you)

[Increasing the likelihood that people will buy is moving the prospect toward pleasure.]

* 7 simple, 5-minute tweaks that add credibility to your site, so people will be more comfortable handing over their credit card and other personal information

[Making people more comfortable handing over information moves the prospect toward pleasure.]

* The one sentence you MUST add to your site if you want anyone to purchase anything from you

[People purchasing moves the prospect toward pleasure.]

* A common, VERY costly mistake you’ve probably made (or are considering making), which leads to your website not making sales (and how to avoid it)

[Making mistakes is painful! So this bullet point shows a feature that moves prospects away from pain.]

Once you’ve mastered the art of the bullet point, you’ll find that your copywriting is more effective, and you’re better able to make your biggest impact.

If this topic resonates with you, you may be interested in the second book in my Love-Based Copywriting series, “Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires, and Invites,” where I take this information on writing powerful bullet points even deeper. Get the book here to discover a new approach to direct response copywriting that feels good to you and to your prospects!