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[Video] Flip It! Who’s Responsible? The Coach or the Client?

[Video] Flip It! Who’s Responsible? The Coach or the Client?

Let me start I’m a big fan of hiring a coach to help guide you on your entrepreneurial path. I personally have worked with some amazing coaches over the years and I wouldn’t be where I am today without their support.

But, alas, not all the coaches I’ve worked with have been awesome. Some are just okay. And some, quite honestly, aren’t all that great.

Which leads me to today’s topic. What happens when you hire a coach and you don’t get the results you were looking for?

Or, if you’re the coach in this scenario, what do you do when you have a client who doesn’t get the results they hired you for?

When this happens, I know it’s tempting to blame the other person. The client will say the coach wasn’t very good or didn’t listen or gave advice that didn’t work.

The coach will say the client didn’t do the work or wasn’t coachable or wasn’t working to work through their blocks.

What’s the truth?

Well, as with most things, the truth is somewhere in the middle.

In my opinion, coaches coach and clients do. And the best relationships are when both are accountable to what their roles are — in other words, coaches are responsible for their coaching and clients are responsible for what they do or don’t do.

The trick is, how do you know where that line is? How can you sort out if the problem is the coaching or the doing?

Watch and see what you think:

(And if you’re wondering exactly how you can get everything you want simply by flipping your perspective? Check out the first episode here.)

If you liked this episode, you may also like my “Love-Based Money and Mindset” book — you can check it out here.

 

Niche vs. Ideal Client – Which Is Better to Grow Your Business?

Niche vs. Ideal Client – Which Is Better to Grow Your Business?

Niche and Ideal Client are buzzwords among business owners, right? And in many cases, they’re used interchangeably.

But as I explained in a recent post, “3 Reasons Your Ideal Client—Not Your Target Market or Niche—Is a Cornerstone of Building Your Love-Based Business,” there’s a huge difference between niche and ideal client.

The distinction is an important one, and that’s why I wanted to revisit the topic today.

First of all, let’s recap. What IS the difference between niche and ideal client?

A niche is a subsection of a target market. A target market is a broad demographic of people. To really dial in on what this means in terms of marketing, let’s look at the definition of demographic: “a particular sector of a population.”

Typically when we talk about demographics, we’re talking about external factors like age, career type, income, or location.

So if your target market was 35-year-old women looking for a business opportunity, then you’d dial in even deeper to find your niche; for example, your niche may be 35-year-old stay-at-home mothers looking for a business opportunity.

An ideal client takes the concept of a niche even deeper. The concept is based on internal factors, like values, desires, and hopes.

When we talk about an ideal client, we’re talking about a specific person, what motivates and inspires her, and what she truly wants at her core.

Since we’re going deeper, let’s drill down with 35-year-old mother example.

Here’s what we have so far:

Target market: women looking for a business opportunity.

Niche: stay-at-home moms looking for a business opportunity.

Right away, I can think of two distinct ideal client groups in this niche.

Ideal Client Group One: A woman who wants this business opportunity not because of money (she has a partner or another source of income that funds her family and her life), but because she feels like she’s losing herself in the roles of wife and mother. She feels guilty for thinking, “Is this all there is?” especially when her neighbor, a mom with a full-time job, tells her how lucky she is that she’s able to stay home with the kids. This ideal client needs flexibility and the option to work as many or as few hours as she wants. She is very clear that being a wife and a mother come first, and she wants the time to be able to cheer at soccer games and pick up dry cleaning without stressing about her business.

Ideal Client Group Two: A woman who has found herself in a position where she needs to be the breadwinner for the family. Money absolutely IS an issue, while flexibility and number of hours required aren’t.

Take a moment to think about the pain each ideal client is going through.

Ideal Client Group One: This mom feels like she’s lost herself. She wants to get in touch with herself again, to establish her own identity separate from that of being a wife and mother. She can afford not to work (although perhaps she may want to bring in some money for “extras,” like vacations or to beef up her children’s college tuition fund), and her priority will always be her wife and mom duties.

Ideal Client Group Two: This mom feels a tremendous amount of responsibility. She wants to make money, and would love a steady source of income she can count on to put food on the table. She’s willing to work as much as possible to take care of her family.

Now, if you were the owner of a company who could offer a business opportunity to each of these ideal clients, think about how differently you’d want to market to each one, presenting your business opportunity as the solution to her pain.

Ideal Client Group One: You would position your business opportunity as a way to do her own “thing,” to enjoy the rewards of being a business owner while still having the time and flexibility to be an attentive wife and mother.

Ideal Client Group Two: You would position your business opportunity as a way to make consistent money, starting right away, so she can put food on the table and pay the bills.

So now you understand why knowing the difference between ideal client and niche is so important!

But which one is better to grow your business?

I’m a big believer that the answer is ideal clients.

I don’t feel like niche markets or target markets go deep enough.

Let’s go back to our example. If you market to your niche—stay-at-home moms looking for a business opportunity—you may do okay. Your marketing may resonate with some of the stay-at-home moms out there, whatever their situations are.

But if you market to your ideal client—either the mom who wants to rediscover herself or the one who wants to support her family—then think about how much more strongly your message will resonate.

Every single piece of marketing you put out there will be that much more effective, right?

Now you may be thinking, but my company is great for both ideal clients in my niche! Why can’t I just target both?

To that, I say while yes, I’m sure you absolutely could fully support both, by trying to appeal to both with your messaging, all you’re doing is diluting your message for both groups.

Combining messages by mixing them together makes you look like a Jack of all trades—and a master of none. And, in the vast majority of cases, if they can afford it, people will prefer to work with a specialist over a generalist.

When you pick one ideal client group to focus on (also known as “picking a horse and riding it”) you’ll improve your results and your business will gain momentum—and you’ll be making a positive impact on precisely the people you’re meant to help!

If this topic resonated with you, you may want to pick up your own copy of “Love-Based Copywriting System: A Step-by-Step Process to Master Writing Copy that Attracts, Inspires and Invites (Volume 2 in the Love-Based Business Series).” You can get it here.

3 Reasons Your Ideal Client—Not Your Target Market or Niche—Is a Cornerstone of Building Your Love-Based Business

3 Reasons Your Ideal Client—Not Your Target Market or Niche—Is a Cornerstone of Building Your Love-Based Business

Building a love-based business is a unique endeavor. It’s not like building just any business. When you’re consciously building a business into one you love, and that loves you back, there’s one really important thing to consider: in order to have a business you love, it’s essential to have clients you love (rather than just marketing to a general target market).

Those clients you love, the ones who love working with you and who sing your praises while you solve a problem they’ve struggled with, are your ideal clients.

On this blog, I’ve talked about writing love-based marketing copy,  plus you can learn more about the philosophy of doing when you pick up your own copy of my “Love-Based Copywriting Method: The Philosophy Behind Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites .”

One of the key principles of writing love-based copy—and to building a successful, profitable, love-based business—is to define and understand your ideal clients.

Now, you may be thinking, if you know who comprises your target market, or what your niche is — you’ve done this already.

But an ideal client is different than either a niche or target market.

Where a target market is a broad demographic, and a niche is a subsection of that demographic, an ideal client is a specific person … and you know exactly what keeps her up at night. You know what motivates her, what inspires her, and what she truly wants at her core.

As the owner of a love-based business, you have a genuine desire to provide a solution for the people who buy your product or service, right?

If you can’t communicate effectively with the people who you’d best serve, then they won’t buy … and you won’t have the opportunity to help them. Not only are you missing out on a sale, but they’re missing out on a potential transformation (likely one they very much desire).

So, that being said, here are three reasons it’s so important to define and understand your ideal client:

  1. You See a Better Return on Investment When It Comes to Your Marketing Efforts.

Different people are motivated by different things, right? Even two members of the same target market or niche may be motivated by different things. For example, if you sell shoes and your niche market is girls ages 10-12, half of them may be motivated by shoes that look awesome and stylish, and the other half may be motivated by shoes that help them run fast. It seems pretty obvious that you’d market to each of these ideal clients differently … efforts to market to both of them at the same time will likely fall flat.

If you’re trying to sell to everyone, you’re probably getting pretty generic. The more generic you get, the less people will recognize their specific problem in your marketing materials. So when you dial in on your ideal clients’ pain points and the transformation you can help them experience, you position yourself as an expert or specialist, and your ideal clients recognize YOU as THE solution they’ve been looking for.

Therefore, you’ll generate better results in terms of client attraction, conversion, and longevity.

  1. It’s MUCH Easier to Market to One Ideal Client Group Than to a Target Market or Niche Market.

The more people you try to market to, the more messages you need to squeeze into your marketing materials, which means if you’re not careful, it can get very confusing. Plus, you’ll likely end up spending even more time writing and creating your marketing messages than you really want to.

You’ll also have more than one place to market. In the above example, girls who want to run fast are probably hanging out in different groups than girls who want the trendiest shoes. So, to reach both groups, you’re going to have spend time and energy in both groups, which again increases the complexity and number of hours you’re spending on your marketing.

Now, in contrast, consider what it’s like to focus on ONE ideal client group. It’s so much easier to craft messages that speak directly to their soul. You’ll also be able to laser focus on the exact places they’re hanging out.

See why it’s easier AND a better return on your investment to market to one ideal client group?

  1. Attracting Ideal Clients Makes Your Business More Profitable.

Even if you have a small group of ideal clients, you’ll actually attract more of them if your messaging is specific to their unique pain points, desires, and hopes. The more specific your messaging is, the more likely your ideal clients will recognize that you’re talking to them, that you understand them, and that you can solve their problems. Therefore, the more likely they’ll be to buy from YOU.

When you do land several ideal clients (rather than a wide range of client types), you’ll be working with folks who love you, and who YOU love. They become raving fans and tell their friends about you.

Meanwhile, your business resources—marketing, time, energy, and effort—are directed toward helping the clients who love you, rather than putting out fires related to less-than-ideal clients.

The less “ideal” a client is, the more of a challenge it becomes to work with him or her. Less-than-ideal clients are the ones who demand the most attention from you and/or your team, as you try (endlessly) to make them happy. They may also be more likely to ask for refunds, or worse, openly badmouth your business.

And, that doesn’t even cover your personal energy level — less-than-ideal clients are likely the ones you dread talking to, who make you shudder when the phone rings and you know it’s them, and who cause your total exhaustion.

I suspect you didn’t start a business because you want to be drained … and working with less-than-ideal clients will do precisely that.

Now, when your business is filled with ideal clients, you’re much more likely to be “filled up” when you work with them. You’ll love getting on the phone with them, and they’ll energize you. Everything will just flow.

And, don’t worry if you feel like your ideal client group is too small — in most cases, there are more than enough ideal clients to fill your business, and you can always “add” ideal client groups later if you really feel like it’s too narrow.

To sum it up, identifying and getting to know your ideal clients is a huge must! And because it’s so important, here’s a quick exercise to get you started.

Exercise

Take a moment to paint a mental picture of your ideal client. Spend some time with her. Really get to know her. This way, when you begin to write your marketing materials, you’ll have someone to whom to write them.

And get really detailed. Give her a name and a favorite coffee drink. What car does she drive? When she wakes up at three a.m., what’s on her mind? What is she worried about?

If this concept resonates with you, I’d love for you to pick up your own copy of my “Love-Based Copywriting Method: The Philosophy Behind Writing Copy That Attracts, Inspires and Invites.”